Past Episodes

Guest: Milan Svolik, Associate Professor of Political Science
Episode: March 8, 2017

Professor Svolik has authored and co-authored articles on the politics of authoritarian regimes and democratization in leading political science journals, including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics. He is the author of The Politics of Authoritarian Rule, which received the best book award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association. In addition to continuing work on the politics of authoritarianism and democratization, Professor Svolik’s current research includes projects on electoral fraud, patronage politics, the politics of identity & redistribution, and a new book Democratization in the Age of Elections.

Learn more about Milan Svolik 

Guest: Louisa Lombard, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: March 1, 2017

Professor Lombard is a cultural anthropologist who studies African borderland areas where the state is largely absent, and a range of actors govern. Her research locales, primarily the remote and little-populated eastern reaches of the Central African Republic, are further marked by violent histories that continue into the present. Her main fieldwork interlocutors are among the region’s men-in-arms, such as anti-poaching guards and rebels.

Learn more about Louisa Lombard

Guest: Tassos Kyriakides, Associate Research Scientist, Yale School of Public Health
Episode: February 22, 2017

Professor Tassos’ primary research focus is in the area of infectious diseases with particular emphasis on HIV/AIDS and its treatment. He also has an interest in the history of medicine, social determinants of health, and the socio-cultural dimension of the benefits of Greek nutrition.

Learn more about Tassos Kyriakides

Guest: Veronica Waweru, Visiting Scholar, Council on African Studies
Episode: February 15, 2017

Professor Waweru is an archeological anthropologist whose research interests cover prehistoric technological change and innovation in our species – Homo sapiens. Her research focuses on prehistoric projectile weaponry from the Kenya Highlands in the later Pleistocene. Her work on early prehistory projectile technology was featured in the PBS documentary The Human Spark. Professor Waweru’s current project at the Yiapan site in Kenya focuses on the use of poison-assisted hunting using projectile technology by early humans.

Learn more about Veronica Waweru

Guest: Joshua Lynn, Visiting Fellow, Center for the Study of Representative Institutions
Episode: February 8, 2017

Professor Lynn studies nineteenth-century politics, culture, and political thought in the United States, with particular attention to the interaction of race, gender, and conservatism in antebellum political culture.

Learn more about Joshua Lynn 

 
Guest: Erik Harms, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Southeast Asia Studies
Episode: February 1, 2017

Professor Harms is a social-cultural anthropologist specializing in Southeast Asia and Vietnam. His ethnographic research in Vietnam has focused on the social and cultural effects of rapid urbanization on the fringes of Saigon—Ho Chi Minh City. More recently, his work has focused on the uses and abuses of “culture” and “urban civility” in urban Vietnam, and how this civilizing discourse entwines with spatial action in ways that legitimize broad-scale privatization. While grounded ethnographically in Vietnam, his research and teaching seeks at all turns to connect with larger world-historic processes, unraveling the interaction between culture and politics, and the ways in which every day acts are informed by larger political agendas.

Learn more about Erik Harms. 

Guest: Inderpal Grewal, Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Episode: January 25, 2017

Professor Grewal is the author of Home and Harem: Nation, Gender, Empire and the Cultures of Travel and Transnational America: Feminisms, Diasporas, Neoliberalisms. She has also published several edited and coedited collections. Her ongoing projects include essays on the relation between transnational media, and corruption and sexual violence.

Learn more about Inderpal Grewal.

Guest: Anastasia Shesterinina, Visiting Fellow, Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence
Episode: January 18, 2017

Professor Shesterinina’s main research area is the internal dynamics of armed conflict. She recently published an article in the American Political Science Review, titled “Collective Threat Framing and Mobilization in Civil War.” The article builds upon and extends her fieldwork-intensive doctoral dissertation, which analyzes violent mobilization across the civil war stages in the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict.

Learn more about Anastasia Shesterinina 

Guest: Dean Karlan, Professor of Economics
Episode: December 14, 2016

Dean Karlan is a professor of economics at Yale University and President and Founder of Innovations for Poverty Action. IPA is a research and policy non-profit that discovers and promotes effective solutions to global poverty problems. Since its founding in 2002, IPA has worked with over 400 leading academics to conduct over 600 evaluations in 51 countries. This research has informed hundreds of successful programs that now impact millions of individuals worldwide.

Learn more about Dean Karlan

Guest: Philip Gorski, Professor of Sociology
Episode: December 7, 2016

Philip Gorski is a professor of sociology. He is a comparative-historical sociologist with strong interests in theory and methods and in modern and early modern Europe. Professor Gorski’s empirical work focuses on topics such as state-formation, nationalism, revolution, economic development and secularization with particular attention to the interaction of religion and politics. His other interests include the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences and the nature and role of rationality in social life.

Learn more about Philip Gorski

Guest: Dr. Nicholas Alipui, Senior Fellow, African Studies and Global Health
Episode: November 30, 2016

Dr. Nicholas Alipui is an expert in child health and development and former United Nations Director & Senior Adviser on the Post 2015 Development Agenda and most recently Director of Programs for UNICEF. He is a Senior Fellow, African Studies and Global Health, at the MacMillan Center and teaching a course on child health and development in context of sustainable development. Dr. Alipui has more than 30 years of experience in strategic leadership, intergovernmental negotiations, child rights advocacy and programming in diverse country and regional settings with a special focus on Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, including serving as UNICEF Representative in Kenya and the Philippines.

Learn more about Dr. Nicholas Alipui 

Guest: David R. Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: November 16, 2016

David R. Cameron is a professor of political science and the director of the Program in European Union Studies at the MacMillan Center. On June 23rd a small majority of British voters – 52% - voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, which many did not think would happen. David Cameron, the prime minister of the U.K. who called the referendum, resigned and Theresa May succeeded him and formed a new government which is preparing to negotiate the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

Learn more about David R. Cameron

Guest: Lawrence Liang, Rice Visiting Fellow
Episode: November 9, 2016

Lawrence Liang is a legal researcher and lawyer based Bangalore, India, known for his legal campaigns on issues of public concern. He is at Yale as the Rice Visiting Fellow in the South Asian Studies Council at the MacMillan Center. His key areas of interest are law, popular culture, and piracy. Professor Liang has been working closely with the Sarai program at the Center for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi on a joint research project on intellectual property.

Learn more about Lawrence Liang

Guest: Shibashis Chatterjee, Fulbright-Nehru Visiting Professor
Episode: November 2, 2016

Shibashis Chatterjee is the Fulbright-Nehru Visiting Professor in the South Asian Studies Council at the MacMillan Center and a professor at Jadavpur University in India. His research interests include international relations theory, foreign policy, and security policy in South Asia.

Learn more about Shibashis Chatterjee

Guest: Steven B. Smith, Professor of Political Science
Episode: October 26, 2016

Steven B. Smith is the Alfred Cowles Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Center for the Study of Representative Institutions at the MacMillan Center, which focuses on the theory and practice of representative government in the Anglo-American world. His research interests include the history of political philosophy with special attention to the problem of the ancients and moderns, the relation of religion and politics, and theories of representative government. His best known publications include Spinoza’s Book of LifeThe Cambridge Companion to Leo Strauss, and Political Philosophy

Learn more about Steven B. Smith

Guest: Emily Erikson, Associate Professor of Sociology
Episode: October 19, 2016

Emily Erikson is an associate professor of sociology at Yale University. She conducts research in the fields of social networks, comparative historical sociology, organizations, theory, and economic sociology, with a focus on the role of social networks in historical and cultural change. Professor Erikson’s book, Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600-1757, won the MacMillan Center’s 2016 Gaddis Smith International Book Prize for best first book.

Learn more about Emily Erikson

Guest: Lamin Sanneh, D. Willis James Professor of Missions and World Christianity
Episode: October 12, 2016

Lamin Sanneh is the D. Willis James Professor of Missions and World Christianity at Yale Divinity School, a professor of history, and director of the Project on Religious Freedom and Society in Africa at the MacMillan Center. He is the author of more than 200 articles on religious and historical subjects, and of several books, including Disciples of All Nations: Pillars of World Christianity.

Learn more about Lamin Sanneh

Learn more about Beyond Jihad: The Pacifist Tradition in West African Islam.

Guest: Ana María Ibáñez, Rice Visiting Professor and Senior Fellow at the MacMillan Center
Episode: October 5, 2016

Ana María Ibáñez is a professor and former dean of the School of Economics at the Universidad de los Andes. She is at Yale University as a Rice Visiting Professor and Senior Fellow at the MacMillan Center. Professor Ibáñez’ research studies the economic consequences of internal conflict, in particular the costs of war and conflict on the civilian population.

Learn more about Ana María Ibáñez

Guest: Reinaldo Funes Monzote, Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Visiting Professor
Episode: May 4, 2016

Reinaldo Funes Monzote is at Yale as the Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Visiting Professor at the MacMillan Center. He is Associate Professor of History at the University of Havana, Cuba, and the author of From Rainforest to Cane Field in Cuba, the award-winning environmental history of Cuba since the age of Columbus.

Learn more about Reinaldo Funes Monzote.
 

Guest: Basak Kus, Visiting Faculty Fellow, Council on Middle East Studies
Episode: April 27, 2016

Basak Kus is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Wesleyan University. She is here at Yale as a Visiting Faculty Fellow in the Council on Middle East Studies at the MacMillan Center. Her research areas of interest include inequality, finance and society, regulatory politics, and economic crises and reforms. She also writes about Turkish political economy.

Learn more about Basak Kus

Guest: Ambassador Yuriy Sergeyev, Visiting Fellow, European Studies Council
Episode: April 20, 2016

Yuriy Sergeyev is a former Ukrainian diplomat and politician, who has served as Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the United Nations. He is here at Yale as a visiting fellow in the Council on European Studies at the MacMillan Center. 
 

Learn more about Yuriy Sergeyev

Guest: Nobuhiro Hiwatari, Visiting Fellow, Council on East Asian Studies
Episode: April 13, 2016

Nobuhiro Hiwatari is a Visiting Fellow in the Council on East Asian Studies at the MacMillan Center. He is a professor of international political economy at the University of Tokyo. Professor Hiwatari’s research interests are the party politics of “neo-liberal” reforms in OECD countries, as well as the impact of political regime heterogeneity on economic cooperation in the Asian-Pacific region. His work on these topics has appeared in academic journals, as well as edited volumes.
 

Learn more about Nobuhiro Hiwatari

Guest: Marcia Inhorn, William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs
Episode: April 6, 2016

A specialist on Middle Eastern gender, religion, and health, Professor Inhorn has conducted research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America over the past 30 years. She is the author of five books on the subject, as well as nine edited volumes.

Learn more about Marcia Inhorn.

Guest: Paul North, Professor of Germanic Language and Literature
Episode: March 30, 2016

Paul North is a Professor of Germanic Language and Literature at Yale. He has written numerous articles and books, including The Problem of Distraction. He is also co-editor of IDIOM: inventing writing theory, a book series at Fordham University Press.

Learn more about Paul North.

Guest: Ayesha Ramachandran, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature
Episode: March 9, 2016
Ayesha Ramachandran is an assistant professor of comparative literature at Yale University. Her research and teaching focus on the literature and culture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, primarily on Europe’s relations with an expanding world. She has published articles on Spenser, Lucretius, Tasso, Petrarch, Montaigne, and on postcolonial drama. She was awarded a Junior Fellowship at the Harvard Society of Fellows in 2007.
 
Guest: Genevieve LeBaron, Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance & Abolition
Episode: March 2, 2016
Genevieve LeBaron is a Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Sheffield in the U.K., and Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance & Abolition at the MacMillan Center. She is the author of Protest Inc.: The Corporatization of Activism with Peter Dauvergne as well as numerous journal articles. She also writes widely for the media and is Founder and Editor of the Beyond Trafficking and Slavery section of openDemocracy.net, which has over 9 million readers. Last year she was awarded the British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences’ Rising Star Engagement Award. 
 
Guest: Thomas Pogge, Leitner Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs
Episode: February 24, 2016
Thomas Pogge is the Director of the Global Justice Program at the MacMillan Center and Leitner Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs at Yale University. He has published widely on Kant and on moral and political philosophy, including various books on Rawls and global justice. Professor Pogge currently heads an international team effort to blueprint and create the Health Impact Fund, which will work to improve access to advanced medicines for the poor worldwide. He is also president of Academics Stand Against Poverty, an independent global organization that aims to eradicate severe poverty worldwide by leveraging the knowledge and standing of academics in order to influence policy and public attitudes.
 

Learn more about Thomas Pogge

Guest: John Roemer, Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Economics
Episode: February 17, 2016
John Roemer is the Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Economics at Yale University. His research concerns political economy and distributive justice. Professor Roemer is a fellow of the Econometric Society, a past Guggenheim fellow and Russell Sage fellow, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a corresponding fellow of the British Academy. He has published many articles and books in economics, political philosophy and political theory, including a number of publications including Political Competition, Equality of Opportunity, Theories of Distributive Justice, and A General Theory of Exploitation and Class. Today we talk with him about a book he has recently written in collaboration with Humberto Llavador and Joaquim Silvestre titled Sustainability for a Warming Planet.
 
Guest: Saghar Sadeghian, Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow
Episode: February 10, 2016

Saghar Sadeghian is the Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow and Lecturer at the MacMillan Center. Her research focuses on the ideas of nationality, constitution, and modern institutions in Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is specifically interested in minority groups in the Middle East and the question of gender, race, religion and ethnicity.

Learn more about Saghar Sadeghian

Guest: Rima Salah, Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale Child Study Center
Episode: February 3, 2016

Rima Salah is an assistant clinical professor at the Yale Child Study Center and former Deputy Executive Director of UNICEF. We talk with Professor Salah about her new book, Pathways to Peace: The Transformative Power of Children and Families, that she edited in collaboration with Dr. James Leckman and Catherine Panter-Brick from Yale University.

Learn more about Rima Salah

Guest: T.L. Cowan, Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Lecturer
Episode: January 27, 2016
Professor Cowan is a writer, performer, activist, and professor. She is currently at Yale as the Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Lecturer and Digital Humanities Fellow. Her academic work focuses on the cultural and intellectual economies and social lives of transfeminist and queer grassroots performance. 
 
Guest: Georg Fischer, European Union Visiting Fellow
Episode: January 20, 2016

Georg Fischer is the 2015-16 European Union Visiting Fellow for the EU Studies Program at the MacMillan Center. He is on leave from his job as the analysis/evaluation Director at the Employment and Social Policy Department of the European Commission. He is a labor economist who, before joining the EU, worked for the Austrian Finance and Labour ministries in Vienna, the OECD in Paris, the Social Science Center Berlin and the Economic Cooperation Foundation in Tel Aviv. Mr. Fischer’s main research interests are integration and divergence in the U.S. labor market and welfare system as a source for reflection on how the EU can achieve a higher degree of labour market and social convergence - increasingly seen as condition for the long term sustainability of the European Economic and Monetary Union. He is also interested in EU and U.S. relations and in exchanges with students and scholars on European affairs and developments.

Learn more about Georg Fischer

Guest: Sara Brinegar, Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow, European Studies Council
Episode: December 9, 2015
Sara Brinegar is a visiting scholar who is at Yale as the Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow in the European Studies Council at the MacMillan Center. Her research interests include the history of the Soviet Union, imperial Russia, the late-Ottoman Empire and imperial Germany. 
 
Guest: Meriem El Haitami, Rice Fellow, Council on Middle East Studies
Episode: December 2, 2015
Meriem El Haitami is a visiting scholar who is at Yale as the Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow in the Council on Middle East Studies at the MacMillan Center. Her research explores the dynamics of female religious authority and activism in contemporary Morocco. She has published articles on the role of female faith-based actors in shaping new forms of religious leadership and activism in Morocco.
 
 
 
Guest: Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO of New America
Episode: November 25, 2015

From 2009-2011 Professor Slaughter served as the director of Policy Planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Prior to her government service, Professor Slaughter was the Dean of Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs from 2002–2009 and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School from 1994-2002. She has written or edited several books, including A New World Order and The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World, and is a frequent contributor to a number of publications, including The Atlantic and Project Syndicate. In 2012, she published “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” in The Atlantic, and it quickly became the most read article in the history of the magazine and helped spark a renewed national debate on the continued obstacles to full male-female equality. From that article grew her most recent book, titled Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family. Professor Slaughter is with us today because she is giving the Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs at the MacMillan Center which center on her forthcoming book, The Chessboard and the Web.

Learn more about Anne-Marie Slaughter

Guest: Catherine Panter-Brick, Professor of Anthropology
Episode: November 18, 2015

Catherine Panter-Brick is a medical anthropologist, trained in human biology and the social sciences. She directs the Program on Conflict, Resilience, and Health at the MacMillan Center to engage with academics, practitioners, and policy makers who promote innovations in global health. Together with faculty at Yale, UNICEF, and other global partners, she works with the Early Childhood Peace Consortium to disseminate scientific knowledge on peace building and violence prevention. Professor Panter-Brick has directed more than 40 interdisciplinary projects worldwide, has written many scientific articles, and co-edited seven books, including “Pathways to Peace.”

Learn more about Catherine Panter-Brick

Guest: Ned Blackhawk, Professor of History and American Studies
Episode: November 11, 2015

Professor Blackhawk’s field of interest is American Indian history. He is the author of Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West, a study of the American Great Basin that garnered numerous professional prizes, including the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize from the Organization of American Historians. He has also published numerous “state of the field” essays for many of America’s leading professional historical associations, and has help to build the newly established Native American Cultural Center at Yale.

Learn more about Ned Blackhawk

Guest: Deborah Bräutigam, Coca-Cola World Fund at Yale Lecturer
Episode: November 4, 2015
Professor Bräutigam, a leading expert on China in Africa, is the MacMillan Center’s Coca-Cola World Fund at Yale Lecturer. She is the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy at Johns Hopkins University, and her teaching and research focus on international development strategies, governance, and foreign aid. She regularly advises international agencies and governments on China-Africa economic engagement. Professor Bräutigam is the author of The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa and Chinese Aid and African Development: Exporting Green Revolution. We talk with her about her new book, Will Africa Feed China? It focuses on the question of “land grabs”, food security, and Chinese agribusiness investment in Africa.
 
Learn more about Deborah Bräutigam
 
 
Guest: Millicent Marcus, Professor of Italian Language and Literature
Episode: October 28, 2015

Millicent Marcus talks about the anti-Mafia martyr genre in Italian film.

Professor Marcus specializes in Italian culture from the interdisciplinary perspectives of literature, history, and film. She is the author of An Allegory of Form: Literary Self-Consciousness in the Decameron, Italian Film in the Light of Neorealism, Filmmaking by the Book: Italian Cinema and Literary Adaptation, After Fellini: National Cinema in the Postmodern Age, and Italian Film in the Shadow of Auschwitz, as well as journal articles and encyclopedia entries.

Learn more about Millicent Marcus.

Guest: John MacKay, Professor of Slavic languages and literatures, and film and media studies
Episode: October 14, 2015

John MacKay talks about his forthcoming book, Dziga Vertov: Life and Work.

Professor MacKay’s research interests include 19th & 20th-century Russian literature, Russian and Soviet culture, comparative literature, literary and cultural theory, film studies, especially film theory and documentary cinema. Professor MacKay’s recent publications include True Songs of Freedom: Uncle Tom’s Cabin in Russian Culture and Society; Four Russian Serf Narratives; and Inscription and Modernity: From Wordsworth to Mandelstam.

Learn more about John MacKay.

Guest: David Mayhew, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Episode: October 7, 2015

David Mayhew talks about his new book, The Imprint of Congress.

Professor Mayhew is widely considered one of the leading scholars on the American Congress. He has authored numerous works on Congress, political parties, elections, and policymaking, including “Congress: The Electoral Connection,” “Divided We Govern,” “America’s Congress,” “Electoral Realignments,” “Parties and Policies,” and “Partisan Balance.” He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the James Madison and Samuel J. Eldersveld awards for career contributions.

Learn more about David Mayhew
 

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: September 30, 2015

David Cameron, who is a professor of political science and the director of the Yale Program in European Union Studies, talks bout the refugee crisis in the European Union. Europe is facing an unprecedented humanitarian crisis.  Day after day, thousands of refugees from Syria, Iraq and other conflicts have undertaken long and perilous journeys, both across the Mediterranean and through the Balkans in the hope of finding shelter and obtaining asylum in the European Union. Every day, we hear of one EU state after another instituting border controls, some quite drastic, to stop the flow of migrants.  And day after day, we hear about disagreements among the members of the EU over how to respond to the crisis, including about how to share in the burden of receiving the migrants.

Learn more about David Cameron.

Guest: Alan Mikhail, Professor of History
Episode: September 23, 2015

Professor Mikhail is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt. His work concentrates on topics in the history of empires and environmental history, and he is among the small handful of historians working in the field of Middle East environmental history. Professor Mikhail is the author of Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History, which won the Roger Owen Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association, the Gustav Ranis International Book Prize from the MacMillan Center, as well as Yale’s Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize. We talk with Professor Mikhail about his new book, The Animal in Ottoman Egypt, for which he was again awarded the MacMillan Center’s Gustav Ranis International Book Prize.

Learn more about Alan Mikhail.

Guest: Julia Stephens, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: May 13, 2015

Professor Stephens is an historian of modern South Asia, and her research focuses on how law has shaped religion, family, and economy in colonial and post-colonial South Asia and in the wider Indian diaspora. She teaches courses on modern South Asia, Islam, gender and colonialism.

We talk with Professor Stephens about the book manuscript she is currently working on tentatively entitled Governing Islam: Law and Secularism in Colonial South Asia.

Learn more about Julia Stephens

Guest: Margaret Peters, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: May 6, 2015

Professor Peters’ research focuses broadly on international political economy with a special focus on the politics of migration. Her work has appeared in International Organization, World Politics, and International Interactions.

We talk with Professor Peters about her recent World Politics article, entitled “Open Trade, Closed Borders: Immigration in the Era of Globalization.”

Learn more about Margaret Peters.

Guest: David Jackson, Professor of Portuguese
Episode: April 29, 2015

David Jackson’s research interests include Portuguese and Brazilian Literatures; Camões, Machado de Assis, Fernando Pessoa; modernist, vanguardist, and inter-arts literature; Portuguese culture in Asia; and ethnomusicology.

We talk with Professor Jackson about his new book, entitled Machado de Assis: A Literary Life.

Learn more about David Jackson.

Guest: Michael Reed-Hurtado, Coca-Cola World Fund Faculty Fellow at Yale
Episode: April 8, 2015

 

Professor Reed-Hurtado is a Colombian/US journalist and lawyer with more than 20 years of experience in the field of Latin American human rights.

We talk with him about transitional justice in Colombia.

Learn more about Michael Reed-Hurtado.

Guest: Emma Sky, Jackson Institute Senior Fellow
Episode: April 1, 2015

Professor Sky lectures on the new Iraq and Middle East politics. She is a British citizen who has worked at senior levels on behalf of the US and UK governments in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Jerusalem, across the fields of development, defense, and diplomacy, and with both civilian and military agencies.

We talk with Emma Sky about her new book, The Unraveling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq.

Learn more about Emma Sky.

Guest: Eckart Frahm, Professor of Assyriology
Episode: March 25, 2015

Professor Frahm’s main research interests are Assyrian and Babylonian history and Mesopotamian scholarly texts of the first millennium BCE. His undergraduate courses at Yale include topics in Mesopotamian history, religion, and literature, and the Bible in its ancient Near Eastern setting. Professor Frahm has authored several books, including Babylonian and Assyrian Text Commentaries: Origins of Interpretation. He is currently in the process of creating an online portal that provides key information and full editions of these commentaries.

We talk with Eckart Frahm about the psychohistory of an Assyrian king.

Learn more about Eckart Frahm.

Guest: Ardis Butterfield, Professor of English, French, and Music
Episode: March 4, 2015

Professor Butterfield specializes on the works of Chaucer, literatures of France and England from the 13th to 15th centuries, and on medieval music, as well as on theories and histories of language, form, and genre, city writing, and bilingualism and medieval linguistic identities. Her books include “The Familiar Enemy: Chaucer, Language, and the Nation in the Hundred Years War” and “Poetry and Music in Medieval France.” She edited “Chaucer and the City,” a collection of essays. She also cofounded The Medieval Song Network, a collaborative, international project to encourage new interdisciplinary research on the medieval lyric.

Guest: John Githongo, anti-corruption activist
Episode: February 25, 2015

John Githongo is Kenya’s most prominent anti-corruption activist and the CEO of INUKA Kenya Trust, an NGO that works to increase citizen empowerment and good governance. Mr. Githongo is the Chairman of the Africa Institute for Governing with Integrity; board member of the Africa Center for Open Governance; and a Commissioner of the Independent Commission on Aid Impact of the British government. In 2011, he was selected as one of the world’s 100 most influential Africans by New African magazine and one of the world’s top 100 global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine. From 2003 to 2004, Githongo served as permanent secretary for governance and ethics in the post-transition government of Kenya’s third president, Mwai Kibaki. However, he began to expose corruption within the administration that appointed him. Fearing for his safety, he fled Kenya and spent time in Britain. He returned to Kenya in 2008. We talk with John Githongo about corruption and the future of Kenya.

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: February 18, 2015

David Cameron is a Professor of Political Science and the Director of the Program in EU Studies at the MacMillan Center. He has written extensively about the Eurozone debt crisis and, most recently, the EU’s Eastern Partnership and the crisis in Ukraine. We talk with Professor Cameron about Greece and the latest Eurozone crisis.

Guest: ishwar Rizvi, Associate Professor, History of Art
Episode: February 11, 2015

Professor Rizvi is an historian of Islamic art and architecture. She has written on representations of religious and imperial authority in Safavid Iran, as well as on issues of gender, nationalism, and religious identity in modern Iran and Pakistan. She is the author of “The Safavid Dynastic Shrine: History, Religion and Architecture in Early Modern Iran,” and the editor of “Modernism and the Middle East: Architecture and Politics in the 20th Century.” Today we will talk with Professor Rizvi about her new book project, “The Transnational Mosque: Architecture and Historical Memory in the Contemporary Middle East.”

Guest: Jenifer Van Vleck, Assistant Professor of History & American Studies
Episode: February 4, 2015

Jenifer Van Vleck: Empire of the Air: Aviation and the American Ascendancy. Episode: February 4, 2015
Professor Van Vleck is an historian of 20th century U.S. and international history. Her research and teaching focus on U.S. foreign relations, with particular emphasis on the ways in which culture, technology, and private enterprise have shaped the United States’ role in the world. She is also interested in transnational approaches to the study of empire and imperialism, modernization, and globalization. We talk with Jenifer Van Vleck about Empire of the Air: Aviation and the American Ascendancy.

Guest: Leslie Harkema, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Episode: January 28, 2015

Professor Harkema’s research focuses on 19th- and 20th-century Peninsular literature, with a particular interest in how post-Enlightenment literature in Spain responds to political, religious, and scientific discourses within modernity. We talk with Leslie Harkema talks about Miguel de Unamuno and “The Young Literature.”

Learn more about Leslie Harkema.

Guest: Marijeta Bozovic, Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Episode: January 21, 2015

Professor Bozovic is focused on twentieth and twenty-first-century Russian poetry, Russian and Balkan avant-gardes, diasporas and transnational culture, translation and adaptation across media, and the poetics and politics of the Danube river. She is the author of several publications including, Nabokov’s Canon: from Onegin to Ada, which is due out in 2016. We talk with Marijeta Bozovic about Radical Poetics after the Soviet Union.

Learn more about Marijeta Bozovic.

Guest: Carol Armstrong, Professor of Art History
Episode: December 3, 2014

Carol Armstrong is a Professor of Art History at Yale. She teaches and writes about 19th century French painting, the history of photography, the history and practice of art criticism, feminist theory and the representation of women and gender in art and visual culture. Professor Armstrong has published books and essays on Edgar Degas, Edouard Manet, Paul Cézanne, and 19th and 20th century photography, and has curated several museum exhibitions. She is an art critic and has been a frequent contributor to October and Artforum magazines. She is also a practicing photographer. We talk with Carol Armstrong aboutCézanne’s Gravity.

Learn more about Carol Armstrong

Guest: Rohit De, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: November 19, 2014

Rohit De is an assistant professor of history at Yale University. He is an historian of modern South Asia and is particularly interested in legal history and comparative constitutional law. Professor De has assisted Chief Justice K.G. Balakrishnan of the Supreme Court of India and has worked on constitution reform projects in Nepal and Sri Lanka. We talk with Rohit De about The Republic of Writs: Litigious Citizens, Constitutional Law and Everyday Life in India.

Learn more about Rohit De

Guest: Graeme Auld, Visiting Associate Professor of Canadian Studies and Political Science
Episode: November 12, 2014

Professor Auld is at Yale University as a visiting associate professor of Canadian Studies and Political Science. With broad interests in comparative environmental policy and global environmental governance, his research examines the emergence, evolution and impacts of non-state and hybrid forms of global governance across economic sectors, particularly fisheries, agriculture, and forestry. He has published widely on environmental certification programs and environmental policy and governance. We talk with Graeme Auld about the rise and evolution of forest, coffee, and fisheries certification.

Learn more about Graeme Auld

Guest: Louisa Lombard, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: November 5, 2014

Professor Lombard is a cultural anthropologist who studies African borderland areas where the state is largely absent, and a range of actors govern. Her research locales, primarily the remote and little-populated eastern reaches of the Central African Republic, are further marked by violent histories that continue into the present. Professor Lombard’s main fieldwork interlocutors are among the region’s men-in-arms, such as anti-poaching guards and rebels. We talk with Louisa Lombard about violence, popular punishment and war in the Central African Republic.

Learn more about Louisa Lombard

Guest: Howard Dean, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute
Episode: October 29, 2014

Many of us are familiar with Mr. Dean from his run for the presidency in 2004. Prior to that, he served as Governor of Vermont for six terms from 1991 to 2003. Mr. Dean was elected as chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 2005, serving until 2009. As Chair, he was lead strategist, spokesman and fundraiser for the DNC. Mr. Dean is credited with pioneering an energetic 50-state strategy and the development of 21st century campaign tools that helped Democrats make historic gains in the 2006 and 2008 elections. Before entering politics, he worked as a physician. Mr. Dean currently works as an independent consultant focusing on the areas of health care, early childhood development, alternative energy, and the expansion of grassroots politics around the world. He also continues to be active in Democratic Party politics. We talk with Howard Dean about U.S. foreign policy.

Learn more about Howard Dean

Guest: Carlos Eire, Professor of History and Religious Studies
Episode: October 22, 2014

Professor Eire specializes in the social, intellectual, religious, and cultural history of late medieval and early modern Europe, with a strong focus on both the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the history of popular piety; and the history of death. He is the author of a number of scholarly books, includingWar Against the Idols: The Reformation of Worship From Erasmus to Calvin; From Madrid to Purgatory: The Art and Craft of Dying in Sixteenth Century Spain; and A Very Brief History of Eternity. Professor Eire has also ventured into the twentieth century and the Cuban Revolution in his memoir Waiting for Snow in Havana, which won the National Book Award in Nonfiction in the United States in 2003 and has been translated into more than a dozen languages – but is banned in Cuba. His latest memoir, Learning to Die in Miami,published in 2010, explores his boyhood exile experience. We talk with Carlos Eire about what it’s like to write two very different kinds of history.

Learn more about Carlos Eire.

Guest: Raila Odinga, former prime minister of Kenya
Episode: October 15, 2014

Raila Amolo Odinga was prime minister of the Republic of Kenya from 2008 to 2013. He was first elected as the Member of Parliament for Langata in 1992, served as Minister of Energy from 2001 to 2002 and as Minister of Roads, Public Works, and Housing from 2003 to 2005. Mr. Odinga ran against incumbent Mwai Kibaki in the 2007 presidential election. While the results of that election were largely in question, Mr. Kibaki was announced the winner and Mr. Odgina accused Mr. Kibaki of electoral fraud. Two months of violence in the country ensued before Kofi Anna, the United Nations Secretary General at the time, intervened and brokered a deal that provided for power-sharing between Mr. Odinga and Mr. Kibaki, and the recreation of the post of Prime Minister. We talk with Raila Odinga about the state of democracy in Africa.

View Raila Odinga deliver the Coca-Cola World Fund at Yale Lecture.

Guest: Catherine Panter-Brick, Professor of Anthropology, Health, and Global Affairs
Episode: October 8, 2014

Professor Panter-Brick’s research consists of critical analyses of health and wellbeing across key stages of human development, giving special attention to the impact of poverty, disease, malnutrition, armed conflict, and social marginalization. Her focus on children in global adversity has included biocultural research with street children, refugees, and war-affected adolescents. She has published widely on child and adolescent health, including articles on conflict and mental health in Afghanistan, household decision-making and infant survival in famine-stricken Niger, the social ecology of growth retardation in Nepali slums, biomarkers of stress in the context of violence and homelessness, and the effectiveness of public health and humanitarian interventions. We talk with Professor Panter-Brick about research she’s done on the role fathers play in parenting.

Learn more about Catherine Panter-Brick

Guest: Vladimir Alexandrov, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Episode: October 1, 2014

Professor Alexandrov is an expert on 19th- and 20th-century Russian prose— especially the works of Leo Tolstoy, Andrei Bely and Vladimir Nabokov—and on literary theory. Professor Alexandrov is the author of the books Andrei Bely: The Major Symbolist Fiction, Nabokov’s Otherworld, and Limits to Interpretation: The Meanings of ‘Anna Karenina’, as well as numerous articles and book chapters. He is also editor of The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov. We talk with Vladimir Alexandrov about his new book, The Black Russian, which recently won the MacMillan Center’s Gustav Ranis International Book Prize.

Learn more about Vladimir Alexandrov

Guest: Douglas Rogers, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Episode: May 14, 2014

His research and teaching interests include political and economic anthropology, natural resource extraction and energy, the anthropology of religion, and socialist societies and their postsocialist trajectories. He has done archival and ethnographic research in Russia since 1994. We talk with Douglas Rogers about Oil Culture: Producing the New Russia.

Learn more about Douglas Rogers

Guest: Aaron Dhir, Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Professor of Law
Episode: May 7, 2014

Professor Dhir is a faculty member at Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, Canada. He is currently at Yale as the Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a Global Justice Senior Fellow at the MacMillan Center. His research interests include corporate law, governance, and theory and the intersections of transnational business activity with international human rights norms. We talk with Aaron Dhir about Challenging Boardroom Homogeneity.

Learn more about Aaron Dhir

Guest: Maurice Samuels, Professor of French
Episode: April 30, 2014

Professor Samuels specializes in the literature and culture of nineteenth-century France and in Jewish Studies. His first book, The Spectacular Past: Popular History and the Novel in Nineteenth-Century France won the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize awarded by The MacMillan Center. We talk with Professor Samuels about his second book, Inventing the Israelite: Jewish Fiction in Nineteenth-Century France, which brings to light an almost totally unknown area of fiction in France.

Learn more about Maurice Samuels

Guest: John Merriman, Professor of History
Episode: April 23, 2014

Professor Merriman specializes in modern France, urban and social history, and modern European history since the Renaissance. He has written numerous books, including The Red City: Limoges and the French Nineteenth Century; Margins of City Life: Explorations on the French Urban Frontier; andDynamite Club: How A Café Bombing Ignited the Age of Modern Terror. We talk with John Merriman about the Paris Commune of 1871.

Learn more about John Merriman

Guest: Marcela Echeverri, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: April 16, 2014

Professor Echeverri is an interdisciplinary scholar with a background in Anthropology and Political Theory. Her research and teaching interests focus on the relationship between political subjectivities and social transformation in Latin America from colonial times to the present. We talk with Marcela Echeverri about Indian and Black Royalists in the Age of Revolutions.

Learn more about Marcela Echeverri

Guest: Hélène Landemore, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: April 9, 2014

Professor Landemore’s research interests include democratic theory, theories of justice, the philosophy of social sciences, and the history of thought. Professor Landemore is currently working on a new project on democratic innovations in post-representative democracy. She has just published an article on the inclusive and partly crowdsourced constitution-making process in Iceland and she is involved in the design and study of a crowdsourced legislative process in Finland. She also is researching the question of democracy in the workplace.

Guest: Karen Seto, Professor of Geography and Urbanization
Episode: April 2, 2014

Professor Seto’s research is on the human transformation of land and the links between urbanization, global change, and sustainability. A geographer by training, her research integrates remote sensing, field interviews, and modeling methods to study land change and urbanization, forecast urban growth, and examine the environmental consequences of urban expansion. We talk with Professor Seto about urbanization, global change and sustainability.

Learn more about Karen Seto

Guest: Andrew Quintman, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Episode: March 26, 2014

Professor Quintman specializes in the Buddhist traditions of Tibet and the Himalaya. His areas of teaching and research include Buddhist literature and history, sacred geography and pilgrimage, and visual cultures of the wider Himalayan region. He is also interested in the religious and literary histories of Tibet’s unique southern border communities. We talk with Professor Quintman about The Yogin and the Madman.

Learn more about Andrew Quintman

Guest: Chloe Starr, Assistant Professor of Asian Christianity and Theology
Episode: February 26, 2014

Professor Starr has published on Chinese literature and Chinese theology; recent works include Red-light Novels of the late Qing, a co-edited volume The Quest for Gentility in China, and an edited volume Reading Christian Scriptures in China. She is currently editing and translating a reader in Chinese Christian theology. We talk with Professor Starr about Chinese Intellectual Christianity.

Learn more about Chloe Starr

Guest: Aaron Gerow, Professor of Film Studies and East Asian Languages and Literatures
Episode: February 19, 2014

Professor Gerow teaches courses in Japanese cinema and popular culture, film studies, and film genre, as well as seminars on Japanese film and cultural theory. He has published numerous articles and books in English, Japanese, and other languages on such topics as Japanese early cinema, film theory, contemporary directors, genre, censorship, and cinematic representations of minorities.

Learn more about Aaron Gerow

Guest: Luis Moreno Ocampo, the first Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court and Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute
Episode: February 12, 2014

Luis Moreno Ocampo was the first Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in 2003 and currently a Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute at Yale University. Earlier in his career, he worked as a prosecutor in Argentina. He first came to public attention in 1985, as Assistant Prosecutor in the “Trial of the Juntas.” This trial was the first since the Nuremberg Trials where senior military commanders were prosecuted for mass killings. We talk with Mr. Moreno Ocampo about his work with the ICC.

Learn more about Luis Moreno Ocampo

Guest: David Aktin, Assistant Professor of Economics
Episode: January 29, 2014

Professor Atkin’s primary fields are trade and development. His research focuses on evaluating the impacts of trade liberalization on the poor in the developing world. We talk with Professor Atkin about his work on rug exporting in Egypt and manufacturing soccer balls in Pakistan.

Learn more about David Atkin

Guest: Kate Baldwin, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: January 22, 2014

Professor Baldwin’s current research projects examine how community-level institutions interact with the national state to affect development, democracy and conflict, with a regional focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She has published articles in the American Political Science Review and the American Journal of Political Science. We talk with her about her forthcoming book about the paradox of hereditary chiefs in democratic Africa.

Learn more about Kate Baldwin

Guest: Kathryn Lofton, Professor of Religous Studies & American Studies
Episode: January 15, 2014

Kathryn Lofton is a historian of religion with a particular focus on the cultural and intellectual history of the United States. Through studies of preachers and parents, bathing soap and office cubicles, evangelicalism and liberal theology, Professor Lofton has developed a portrait of religion in America that emphasizes the formation of religion through new technologies, renegade manifestos, and the cornucopia of cultural practices that contribute to social identity in the modern world. We talk with her about her new book, Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon.

Learn more about Kathryn Lofton.

Guest: Xi Chen, Assistant Professor of Public Health
Episode: December 4, 2013

Xi Chen, an Assistant Professor at Yale’s School of Public Health. Professor Chen’s research interests involve health and development economics. His work explores how social interactions affect health behavior and outcomes, and how socioeconomic status drives social competition. Today we’ll talk with Professor Chen about how keeping up with the Joneses is contributing to poverty and health problems in China.

Learn more about Xi Chen

Guest: Gordon Geballe, Associate Dean of Alumni and External Affairs, FES
Episode: November 20, 2013

Gordon Geballe is Associate Dean of Alumni and External Affairs, and Lecturer in Urban Ecology at Yale’s School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is interested in sustainability issues that are faced by small-island developing states. We talk with him about Haiti and sustainable development in a post-disaster context.

Learn more about Gordon Geballe

Guest: Mushfiq Mobarak, Associate Professor of Economics
Episode: November 13, 2013

Mushfiq Mobarak is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Yale School of Management. He is a development economist with interests in environmental issues and has several ongoing research projects in Bangladesh, India, Malawi, and Brazil. Professor Mobarak conducts field experiments exploring ways to induce people in developing countries to adopt technologies or behaviors that are likely to be welfare improving. We talk with him about changing behavior in developing countries.

Learn more about Mushfiq Mobarak.

Guest: Elizabeth Bradley, Professor of Public Health
Episode: November 6, 2013

Elizabeth Bradley is faculty director for the Global Health Initiative and the Global Health Leadership Institute, both of which are at Yale. She is also a professor of public health at Yale’s School of Public Health. Her research focuses on health delivery systems and quality improvement and has contributed important findings about organizational change and quality of care within the hospital, nursing home, and hospice settings. She has been involved with several projects that aim to strengthen health systems in international settings, including China, Ethiopia, Liberia, South Africa and the United Kingdom. We talk with Professor Bradley about the new book she wrote with Lauren Taylor titled, The American Health Care Paradox: Why Spending More is Getting Us Less.

Learn more about Elizabeth Bradley

Guest: Paul Sabin, Associate Professor of History
Episode: October 30, 2013

Paul Sabin is associate professor of history. His research and teaching focus on energy and environmental history. Today we’ll talk with Professor Sabin about his new book, The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon and Our Gamble over Earth’s Future, which provides a framework for understanding today’s environmental debates.

Learn more about Paul Sabin.

Guest: Ben Cashore, Professor of Environmental Governance and Political Science
Episode: October 23, 2013

Ben Cashore is Professor of Environmental Governance and Political Science at Yale’s School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. His research interests focus on non-state market-driven environmental governance, the impact and opportunities of globalization and internationalization on domestic and local environmental policy, corporate sustainability initiatives, and comparative environmental policy. He is a prolific author of books and articles that integrate public policy, corporate social responsibility and international environmental governance. We talk with him about global forest governance.

Learn more about Ben Cashore.

Guest: Bernhard Schima, the European Union Visiting Fellow.
Episode: October 16, 2013

Mr. Schima is a legal adviser in the Euorpean Commission’s Legal Service. He has studied law in Vienna, where he was born, and in Paris and at Harvard Law School. From 1995 to 2003, he was a member of the chambers of Judge Dr. Peter Jann at the European Court of Justice. In 2003, Mr. Schima joined the European Commission’s Legal Service. He has taught and published extensively on various matters of European Union law. We talk with him about the application of EU Fundamental Rights to the Member States after Lisbon and putting the case law of the European Court of Justice into perspective.

Learn more about Bernhard Schima.

Guest: Anders Winroth, Forst Family Professor of History
Episode: October 9, 2013

Professor Winroth, who was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2003, specializes in the history of medieval Europe, especially religious, intellectual and legal history as well as the Viking Age. Today we will talk with him about his new book, The Conversion of Scandinavia: Vikings, Merchants, and Missionaries in the Remaking of Northern Europe, which recently won the MacMillan Center’s Gustav Ranis International Book Prize.

Learn more about Anders Winroth.

Guest: David Simon, Lecturer, Political Science
Episode: October 2, 2013

David Simon studies African politics, focusing on the politics of development assistance and post-conflict situations, particularly in Rwanda. He is editor of the Historical Dictionary of Zambia, and has contributed to Comparative Political Studies, The Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, and The Journal of Genocide Research. He also teaches classes on international relations in Africa and the comparative politics of development. We talk with Professor Simon about building state capacity to prevent atrocity crimes.

Learn more about David Simon.

Guest: David Jackson, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese
Episode: May 22, 2013

David Jackson is a Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. His research interests include Portuguese and Brazilian Literatures; Camões, Machado de Assis, Fernando Pessoa; modernist, vanguardist, and inter-arts literature; Portuguese culture in Asia; and ethnomusicology. We talk with Professor Jackson about the conference he organized, entitled “Goa: A Postcolonial Society between Cultures.”

Learn more about David Jackson.

Guest: Milette Gaifman, Associate Professor of the History of Art and Classics
Episode: May 15, 2013

Milette Gaifman is an associate professor of the history of art and classics. Her research focuses primarily on Greek religious art. Professor Gaifman is interested in topics such as the divine image in Greek religion, the relationship between artifacts and ritual, the variety of forms in Greek art—from the naturalistic to the non-figural—and the historiography of the scholarship of Greek art. We talk about her new book, Aniconism in Greek Antiquity, which was recently awarded the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize by the MacMillan Center. The prize is awarded annually for the best first book by a member of the Yale faculty.

Guest: Ruth Barnes, the Thomas Jaffe Curator of Indo-Pacific Art at the Yale University Art Gallery
Episode: May 8, 2013

Ruth Barnes is the Thomas Jaffe Curator of Indo-Pacific Art at the Yale University Art Gallery. She is an art historian in the field of South and Southeast Asian textiles, with a particular interest in the social history of material culture and its anthropological interpretation, and has studied textiles from South and Southeast Asia, as well as from the Islamic world, from this perspective. We talk with Dr. Barnes about the new Indo-Pacific Gallery.

Learn more about Ruth Barnes.

Guest: Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation
Episode: May 1, 2013

We depart from our normal show format to bring you a lecture that Dr. Mo Ibrahim recently gave as the speaker for the Coca-Cola World Fund Lecture at Yale. Dr. Ibrahim is the founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s leading mobile telephone companies. In 2006, he established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to improve the quality of governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society and governments with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to assess governance and promote accountability. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognizes and celebrates excellence. Listed by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, Dr. Ibrahim has received numerous honorary degrees and awards. The title of Dr. Ibrahim’s lecture is “Governance, Leadership, Civil Society and the Private Sector: An African Perspective.”

Learn more about Mo Ibrahim

Guest: Bradley Woodworth, Coordinator of Baltic Studies
Episode: April 24, 2013

Bradley Woodworth is Coordinator of Baltic Studies at Yale University and Assistant Professor of History at the University of New Haven. His research interests include the social and political history of the multiethnic Baltic provinces and the broader northwestern regions of Imperial Russia, including St. Petersburg and Finland. We talk with Professor Woodworth about the most recent volume he co-edited with Karsten Brüggemann of the University of Tallinn, entitled Russia on the Baltic: Imperial Strategies of Power and Cultural Patterns of Perception (16th-20th Centuries).

Learn more about Bradley Woodworth

Guest: Helen Siu, Professor of Anthropology
Episode: April 17, 2013

Helen Siu is a professor of anthropology. Her teaching interests are political and historical anthropology, and urban and global culture change. For the past four decades, Professor Siu has explored the nature of the socialist state and the refashioning of identities in South China. More recently she is researching the rural-urban divide in China, cross-border dynamics in Hong Kong, and historical and contemporary Asian connections. We talk with Professor Siu about China’s urban revolution.

Learn more about Helen Siu.

Guest: Stephen Davis, Professor of Religious Studies
Episode: April 10, 2013

Stephen Davis is a Professor of Religious Studies, specializing in the history of ancient and medieval Christianity, with a particular focus on the eastern Mediterranean and the Near East. Since 2006, he has served as Executive Director of the Yale Monastic Archaeology Project, conducting field work and training graduate students at two sites in Egypt: the White Monastery near Sohag and the Monastery of John the Little in Wadi al-Natrun. We talk with Professor Davis about life and death in late ancient and early medieval Egyptian monasteries.

Learn more about Stephen Davis

Guest: Ashok Acharya, Henry Hart Rice Foundation Fellow, The MacMillan Center
Episode: April 3, 2013

Ashok Acharya is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Joint Director of Developing Countries Research Centre at the University of Delhi. At Yale, Professor Acharya is the Henry Hart Rice Foundation Fellow at the MacMillan Center. He is author of the forthcoming volume Equality, Difference and Group Rights: The Case of India. Professor Acharya’s research interests encompass contemporary and comparative political theory, affirmative action, and ethics and public policy. We talk with him about his project called Know Your Rights India.

Learn more about Ashok Acharya.

Guest: Eliyahu Stern, Assistant Professor of Modern Jewish Intellectual and Cultural History; Judaic Studies, Religious Studies and History
Episode: March 27, 2013

Eliyahu Stern is Assistant Professor of Modern Jewish Intellectual and Cultural History; Judaic Studies, Religious Studies and History. He researches the transformation and development of traditional and religious worldviews in Western life and thought. In particular, Professor Stern focuses on modern Eastern European Jewry, Zionism, secularism, and religious radicalism. His first book, The Genius Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism, has just been released by Yale University Press. We talk with Professor Stern about his next project dealing with the relationship between religion and secularism in the rise of Zionism.

Learn more about Eliyahu Stern.

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: March 6, 2013

David Cameron is a Professor of Political Science at Yale and the Director of the Program in European Union Studies at the MacMillan Center. He has been on the show a number of times to talk about the ongoing Eurozone debt crisis. Because of the European Central Bank’s announcement last summer that it will do “whatever it takes” to ensure the survival of the euro, there has been a sense that the worst of the crisis is over and that the euro would survive. But that was before the recent Italian election. Professor Cameron will discuss what happened in the Italian election, and how that may affect the survival of the Eurozone.

Learn more about David Cameron

Guest: Jing Tsu, Professor of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture
Episode: February 27, 2013

Jing Tsu is Professor of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. She specializes in modern Chinese literature and culture from the 19th century to the present. Her research areas include nationalism, race, diaspora, Sinophone literature, transnational labor, history of science, and different approaches to large-scale literary and cultural studies. Author of Failure, Nationalism, and Literature: The Making of Modern Chinese Identity, 1895-1937 and Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora, Professor Tsu is also co-editor (with David Der-wei Wang, Harvard) of Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays and (with Benjamin A. Elman, Princeton) Science in Republican China (forthcoming). We talk with her about her most recent published book, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora.

Learn more about Jing Tsu.

Guest: Jessica Pliley, Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellow, Gilder Lerhman Center
Episode: February 20, 2013

Jessica Pliley is an assistant professor of women’s history at Texas State University-San Marcos. She is at Yale as the Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellow at the Gilder Lerhman Center. Professor Pliley has authored an article exploring the feminist politics within the League of Nations Committee on the Trafficking of Women and Children in the Journal of Women’s History and another article that examines how concerns about white slavery served to bolster some women’s rights advocates’ claims that women be included in the federal immigration service at the turn of the century. We talk with her about her book manuscript, Beyond White Slavery: Policing Women and the Growth of the FBI, 1900-1941.

Learn more about Jessica Pliley.

Guest: Elizabeth Bradley, Professor of Public Health
Episode: February 13, 2013

Elizabeth Bradley is the faculty director for the Global Health Initiative and the Global Health Leadership Institute, both of which are at Yale. She is also a professor of public health at Yale’s School of Public Health. Her research focuses on health delivery systems and quality improvement and has contributed important findings about organizational change and quality of care within the hospital, nursing home, and hospice settings. She has been involved with several projects that aim to strengthen health systems in international settings, including China, Ethiopia, Liberia, South Africa and the United Kingdom. We talk with Professor Bradley about the global health efforts at Yale, as well as some of her recent work as a recipient of a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant.

Learn more about Elizabeth Bradley

Guest: Eboo Patel, founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core
Episode: February 6, 2013

Eboo Patel is the founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core. He is at Yale to give the Coca-Cola World Fund at Yale Lecture at the MacMillan Center. Named by U.S. News & World Report as one of “America’s Best Leaders of 2009,” Mr. Patel is the author of the book Sacred Ground: Pluralism, Prejudice, and the Promise of America, and his 2007 autobiography, Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation. He is also a member of President Obama’s Advisory Council of the White House Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. We talk with Mr. Patel about his new book, Sacred Ground.

Learn more about Eboo Patel

Guest: Mario Mancuso, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: January 30, 2013

Mr. Mancuso is a national security and foreign affairs expert who has served in a variety of leadership roles in the U.S. government, including as Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Combating Terrorism. Currently, he is a corporate partner and Chair of the International Trade and Investment practice at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson. His particular area of focus is the relationship between U.S. national security and globalization. At Yale, he teaches a seminar on U.S. strategy and statecraft in the emerging security environment.

Learn more about Mario Mancuso

Guest: Gundula Kreuzer, Associate Professor, Department of Music
Episode: January 23, 2013

In both her writing and her teaching, Professor Kreuzer approaches music from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives, such as social, cultural, and political history as well as theories of multimedia. Her book Verdi and the Germans: From Unification to the Third Reich (winner of the 2011 Lewis Lockwood Award and the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize) examines the changing impact of the popular Italian composer on German musical self-perception and national identity. Her publications have appeared in various journals, encyclopedias, and edited volumes, and have received several prizes from the American Musicological Society as well as the Royal Musical Association and Yale’s Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Publication. We talk with Professor Kreuzer about her new book,Verdi and the Germans.

Learn more about Gundula Kreuzer

Guest: Beverly Gage, Professor of 20th-century U.S. History
Episode: January 16, 2013

Professor Gage’s teaching and research focus on the evolution of American political ideologies and institutions. She teaches courses on terrorism, communism and anticommunism, American conservatism, and 20th-century American politics. Her first book, The Day Wall Street Exploded: A Story of America in its First Age of Terror, examined the history of terrorism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, focusing on the 1920 Wall Street bombing. We talk with Professor Gage about her forthcoming book, G-Man: J. Edgar Hoover and the American Century

Learn more about Beverly Gage.

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: December 12, 2012

Professor Cameron is the Director of the Yale Program in European Union Studies. He teaches courses on European politics and the European Union. He discusses the on-going eurozone debt crisis which began three years ago, shortly after a newly-elected government in Greece announced that the budget deficit would be much larger than the previous government had predicted.

Learn more about David Cameron.

Guest: Daniel Botsman, Professor of History
Episode: December 5, 2012

Daniel Botsman is a professor of history at Yale University. He teaches courses on the history of Japan from 1500 to the present. His publications include a translation of the memoirs of a prominent post-war foreign minister, Okita Saburo: A Life In Economic Diplomacy, and a study of the history of punishment from the 16th to the 20th centuries, Punishment and Power in the Making of Modern Japan. We talk with Professor Botsman about his research paper entitled Freedom without Slavery? ‘Coolies,’ Prostitutes, and Outcastes in Meiji Japan’s ‘Emancipation Moment.’

For more information about Daniel Botsman

Guest: U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
Episode: November 28, 2012

Equal parts diplomat and advocate, civil servant and CEO, the Secretary-General is a symbol of United Nations ideals and a spokesman for the interests of the world’s peoples, in particular the poor and vulnerable among them. Mr. Ban took office in January 2007. In June 2011, he was unanimously re-elected by the General Assembly and will continue to serve as the leader of the United Nations until the end of 2016. Mr. Ban’s priorities have been to mobilize world leaders around a set of new global challenges, from climate change and economic upheaval to pandemics and increasing pressures involving food, energy, and water. Today we talk with him about the civil war in Syria, climate change, and food security.

For more information about Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, please visit the United Nations web site at www.un.org/sg.

Guest: Edwige Tamalet-Talbayev, Assistant Professor of French
Episode: November 21, 2012

Edwige Tamalet-Talbayev is an Assistant Professor of French at Yale University. She is also affiliated with the Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Program, as well as the Council on Middle East Studies and the African Studies Council at the MacMillan Center. Professor Tamalet-Talbayev’s research and teaching interests include: Maghrebi literature in a Mediterranean context; literature of the Maghrebi diaspora in French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian; Mediterranean studies; Orientalism; postcolonial literary and cultural theory; non-Western modernities and transnational modernisms. We talk with her about her forthcoming book, The Transcontinental Maghreb: Francophone Literature in a Mediterranean Context.

Learn more about Edwige Tamalet-Talbayev.

Guest: Thomas Graham, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: November 14, 2012

Mr. Graham is a managing director at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He was Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and Director for Russian Affairs from 2002 to 2004. We talk with Mr. Graham about cyberspace – its components and the potential threats to it.

Learn more about Thomas Graham.

Guest: Colonel Timothy McAteer, Military Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: November 7, 2012

Colonel Timothy McAteer is an active duty U.S. Army Infantry Officer with 23 years of service. The majority of his service has been as a Paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division. He has multiple tactical and operational level deployments ranging from rifle platoon leader in Desert Shield/Desert Storm and the Sinai Egypt, up through service as a Battalion and Division Operations Officer, and Command at the Battalion level in Afghanistan and the Brigade level in Haiti and Iraq. We talk with Colonel McAteer about his role as a Military Fellow at Yale.

Learn more about Colonel Timothy McAteer.

Guest: Daniel Keniston, Assistant Professor of Economics
Episode: October 31, 2012

Professor Keniston’s research focuses largely on the role and structure of markets in developing countries, with other interests in governance, technology adoption, and economic history. We talk with him about two recent studies he has conducted in India on reforming police departments and deterring drunk driving.

Learn more about Daniel Keniston.

Guest: Marica Inhorn, Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs
Episode: October 17, 2012

Professor Inhorn’s research interests revolve around science and technology studies; gender and feminist theory, including masculinity studies; religion and bioethics; globalization and global health; cultures of biomedicine and ethnomedicine; stigma and human suffering. Over the past 20 years, she has conducted multi-sited research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America. Her many books include Local Babies, Global Science: Gender, Religion, and In Vitro Fertilization in Egypt and Infertility and Patriarchy: The Cultural Politics of Gender and Family Life in Egypt. We talk with Professor Inhorn about her new book, The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East.

Learn more about Marcia Inhorn.

Guest: Daniel Magaziner, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: October 10, 2012

Professor Magaziner is an intellectual historian specializing in 20th century South Africa. In 2010 he published his first book, The Law and the Prophets: Black Consciousness in South Africa, a history of political thought in 1970s South Africa. We talk with Professor Magaziner about his new research project, tentatively entitled On a Contested Canvas: Artists and the Art of Life in 20th Century South Africa.

Learn more about Daniel Magaziner.

Guest: Dean Karlan, Professor of Economics
Episode: October 3, 2012

Professor Karlan has been called one of the most creative and prolific young economists in the world. His research lies at the intersection of two of the hottest areas in the field: behavioral economics and development microfinance. With $3.4 million in funding he just received from Citi Foundation, Professor Karlan and the organization he founded—Innovations for Poverty Action—will conduct research on strategies to improve the financial capability of low- and moderate-income individuals across the world. This funding builds on a $7.3 million dollar grant he received from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to study innovations in savings products and payment channels for poor households worldwide. Professor Karlan also has a new book out that he wrote with Jacob Appel titled More Than Good Intentions: Improving the Ways the World’s Poor Borrow, Save, Learn, and Stay Healthy. We talk with him about ways to help end global poverty.

Learn more about Dean Karlan

Guest: Priya Natarajan, Professor of Astronomy and Physics
Episode: May 16, 2012

Professor Natarajan is a theoretical astrophysicist interested in cosmology, gravitational lensing and black hole physics. Her research involves mapping the detailed distribution of dark matter in the universe exploiting the bending of light en-route to us from distant galaxies. However, we are not going to talk to Professor Natarajan about astronomy and physics. We are going to talk with her about gender parity issues. Professor Natarajan is the current chair of the Women Faculty Forum at Yale, and she recently co-organized, along with Judith Resnik and Reva Siegel at the Yale Law School, the first Gruber conference titled Parity as Practice: The Politics of Equality.

Learn more about Priya Natarajan.

Guest: Alan Mikhail, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: May 9, 2012

Professor Mikhail a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science andmedicine. In one of the first environmental histories of the Ottoman Empire, he examines relations between the empire and its most lucrative province of Egypt. We talk with Professor Mikhail about his award-winning new book, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History.

Learn more about Alan Mikhail.

Guest: Robert Bailis, Associate Professor, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Episode: April 25, 2012

Professor Bailis’s research interests focus on sustainability, resource use, and environmental change in the developing world. He explores these issues principally, though not exclusively, in the context of energy. Professor Bailis became interested in the intersection of energy, society, and environment while working as a teacher in the U.S. Peace Corps in a remote community in northwestern Kenya. He uses an interdisciplinary approach that places equal emphasis on qualitative and quantitative methods across a range of scales, from local to regional and global. Past research efforts explored the social ecology of Kenya’s charcoal commodity chain and examined the health and welfare implications of household energy choices in the developing world. He continues to be involved in household energy research. We talk with Professor Bailis about the governance of the emerging biofuel economy.

Learn more about Robert Bailis.

Guest: Jennifer Ruger, Associate Professor, School of Public Health
Episode: April 18, 2012

Professor Ruger has authored numerous theoretical and empirical studies on the equity and efficiency of health system access, financing, resource allocation, policy reform, and social determinants of health. These contributions are unified by an overarching interest in equity and disparities in health and health care, focusing on vulnerable and impoverished populations nationally and globally. We talk with Professor Ruger about her new book, Health and Social Justice.

Learn more about Jennifer Ruger.

Guest: Robert Shiller, Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics
Episode: April 4, 2012

The New York Times best-selling economist Robert Shiller is probably the only person to have predicted both the stock market bubble of 2000 and the real estate bubble that led up to the subprime mortgage meltdown. Yet he is no apologist for the sins of finance. We talk with Professor Shiller about his new and timely book, Finance and the Good Society, where he argues that rather than condemning finance, we need to reclaim it for the common good.

Learn more about Robert Shiller.

Guest: Pablo Kalmanovitz, Political Science Postdoctoral Fellow
Episode: March 28, 2012

Pablo Kalmanovitz specializes in the political theory of human rights and humanitarianism. Professor Kalmanovitz has written articles and edited volumes on transitional justice, post-war reconstruction, and the regulation of warfare, and is currently working on a book project on the history of the idea of post-war justice. We talk with Professor Kalmanovitz about the research he’s done on reparations for war damages.

Learn more about Pablo Kalmanovitz.

Guest: Andrew Hill, Clayton Stephenson Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology
Episode: March 14, 2012

Professor Hill is interested in the whole range of human evolution, particularly in the environmental and ecological context in which it occurred. Since 1968 he has carried out fieldwork in eastern Africa, in Pakistan, and in the United Arab Emirates. For many years he has directed the Baringo Paleontological Research Project, a multidisciplinary research program operating in the Tugen Hills in Kenya. This ongoing work was the topic of a special double issue of theJournal of Human Evolution in 2002, and in 1999, he co-edited Fossil Vertebrates of Arabia. We talk with him about the climate’s influence on human evolution.

Learn more about Andrew Hill.

Guest: Alexander Evans, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: March 7, 2012

Mr. Evans recently was the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress, and previously worked at the Department of State as a senior advisor, first to Ambassador Richard Holbrooke and then to Ambassador Marc Grossman, the U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan. He previously served as a British diplomat in Islamabad and New Delhi and as a member of the Policy Planning Staff in London. We talk with him in a personal capacity about the relationship between the U.S. and South Asia.

Learn more about Alexander Evans.

Guest: Richard Bribiescas, Professor of Anthropology
Episode: February 29, 2012

Professor Bribiescas’ most notable research involves the evolutionary biology and endocrinology of human and comparative life histories, reproduction, aging, and metabolism. He is the author of Men: Evolutionary and Life History.We talk with Professor Bribiescas about the male species from a life history and evolutionary perspective and what affect it can have on our future.

Learn more about Richard Bribiescas.

Guest: Domingo Cavallo, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: February 22, 2012

Currently the Chairman and CEO of DFC Associates, a consultancy firm, Mr. Cavallo was Argentina’s Minister of Economy from 1991 to 1996 and in 2001, and Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1989 to 1991. He was elected National Congressman on two occasions, and also served as Chairman of the Central Bank of Argentina in 1982. We talk with him about Argentina’s economy.

Learn more about Domingo Cavallo.

Guest: Thania Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: February 15, 2012

Professor Sanchez’s teaching and research focuses on international cooperation and international law. In particular, she studies how international law and organizations shape international security and human rights policy. She is currently working on a book on the domestic political factors that affect treaty compliance. We talk with Professor Sanchez about her supply side theory of treaty implementation and compliance.

Learn more about Thania Sanchez.

Guest: Joseph Errington, Professor of Anthropology and International and Area Studies
Episode: February 8, 2012

Professor Errington is interested in the linguistic dimensions of social life, ranging from the social implications of patterns of verbal communication, to forms and uses of sociolinguistic hierarchies, to the linguistic effects of large scale dynamics. His research and writing have focused on linguistic dimensions of modernization and identity in Java and Indonesia, reflecting his broader interests in semiotics and the politics of language. We talk with Professor Errington about his book, Linguistics in a Colonial World: A Story of Language, Meaning, and Power.

Learn more about Joseph Errington.

Guest: Paulina Ochoa Espejo, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: February 1, 2012

Professor Ochoa specializes in contemporary political theory and the history of political thought. We talk with her about her new book, The Time of Popular Sovereignty: Process and the Democratic State. In it, she offers a new theory of democratic peoplehood, laying the foundations for a new theory of democratic legitimacy.

Learn more about Paulina Ochoa Espejo.

Guest: Rakesh Mohan, Professor, School of Management, and Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute of Global Affairs
Episode: January 25, 2012

Rakesh Mohan is one of India’s senior-most economic policymakers and an expert on central banking, monetary policy, infrastructure and urban affairs. He is a former Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank of India. As Deputy Governor he was in charge of monetary policy, financial markets, economic research and statistics. In addition to serving in various posts for the Indian government, including representing India in a variety of international forums such as Basel and G20, he has worked for the World Bank and headed prestigious research institutes. Mohan has written extensively on urban economics, urban development, and Indian economic policy reforms. We talk with him about his book, Growth with Financial Stability: Central Banking in an Emerging Market, which provides a rare insider view into the development and workings of central banking and the financial sector in India.

Learn more about Rakesh Mohan.

Guest: William Kelly, Professor of Anthropology and Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies
Episode: January 18, 2012

Professor Kelly is a noted authority on the social and historical anthropology of Japan. He has focused much of his research in the last two decades on regional agrarian societies in Japan. Since 1996, however, Professor Kelly has been conducting field research on the history and present patterns of professional baseball in the cities of Osaka and Kobe. We talk with him about sports in contemporary Japan.

Learn more about William Kelly.

Guest: Cheryl Doss, Senior Lecturer in International Affairs and Economics
Episode: January 11, 2012

Professor Doss” research interests center around household decision-making in rural households, especially in Africa. In particular, she is interested in how social and economic changes affect the dynamics of decision-making within households. Much of Professor Doss” current work focuses on issues around women”s access to assets, including land. This includes developing methodologies for collecting individual level asset data and empirical work analyzing how women acquire assets, which assets they own and control, and how this affects their well-being. We talk with her about land ownership and land tenure reform as it affects women in Africa.

Learn more about Cheryl Doss.

Guest: Narges Erami, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: December 7, 2011

Professor Erami primarily works on the relationship between economy and religion and how it is played out in rituals of everyday life. Her research is centered in the Holy City of Qum in Iran. Professor Erami’s work includes a historical and ethnographic study of carpet merchants, and she is currently researching the cultural production of authority and knowledge through publications of Islamic texts and their global circulation. We talk with her about her forthcoming book on the Persian rug bazaar.

Learn more about Narges Erami.

Guest: Mark Turin, Associate Research Scientist
Episode: November 30, 2011

Professor Turin is an anthropologist and a linguist. His scholarly focus is on the Himalayan region, in particular Nepal, northern India, Bhutan and cultural Tibet. His research interests include the documentation of endangered languages and mapping global cultural diversity; language policy and the role of native tongue instruction in education; and issues relating to the electronic access and ownership of anthropological materials from ethnographic museums. We talk with Professor Turin about his involvement in the World Oral Literature Project.

Learn more about Mark Turin.

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Episode: November 16, 2011

Professor Cameron teaches courses on European politics and the European Union. Over the past year and a half, the members of the European Union that have adopted the euro have been immersed in a seemingly never-ending debt crisis. First Greece, then Ireland and Portugal, and now Greece again, along with growing concerns about Italy. Why did the crisis happen? Where is it now? And what can the EU do to prevent a similar crisis in the future? We talk with Professor Cameron about the eurozone debt crisis.

Learn more about David Cameron.

Guest: Kaveh Khoshnood, Associate Professor of Epidemiology
Episode: November 9, 2011

Professor Khoshnood is an infectious disease epidemiologist and his primary research interests are the epidemiology, prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis among drug users, prisoners and other at risk populations in United States and in resource-poor countries. He also mentors researchers from around the world and teaches courses on HIV/AIDS, global health and research methods and ethics. We talk with Professor Khoshnood about global health education and how to conduct research in resource-poor settings.

Learn more about Kaveh Khoshnood.

Guest: Timothy Snyder, Professor of History
Episode: November 2, 2011

Professor Snyder teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in modern East European political history. He is the author of Nationalism, Marxism, and Modern Central Europe: A Biography of Kazimierz Kelles-Krauz; The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569 - 1999; Sketches from a Secret War: A Polish Artist’s Mission to Liberate Soviet Ukraine; and The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of A Habsburg Archduke. He is also the co-editor of Wall Around the West: State Power and Immigration Controls in Europe and North America. We talk with Professor Snyder about his most recent book, a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller entitledBloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Learn more about Timothy Snyder.

Guest: Sara Shneiderman, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: October 26, 2011

Professor Shneiderman is a socio-cultural anthropologist working in the Himalayan regions of Nepal, India and China (especially the Tibetan Autonomous Region). Her research addresses the relationships between political discourse, ritual practice, cultural performance and cross-border migration in producing contemporary ethnic identities. Since 2009 she has been involved in a project entitled “Inequality and Affirmative Action in South Asia: Current Experiences and Future Agendas in India and Nepal,” which will hold its final conference in Kathmandu in July 2012. We talk with her about that project and her research on inequality and affirmative action.

Learn more about Sara Shneiderman.
Inequality and Affirmative Action in South Asia.

Guest: Deborah Davis, Professor of Sociology
Episode: October 19, 2011

Professor Davis’s primary teaching and research interests are historical and comparative sociology, inequality and stratification, and contemporary Chinese society. She is a member of the national Committee on U.S. China relations and has just completed a six year term chairing of the social science and humanities panel of the Hong Kong government Research Committee. This past July Professor Davis organized a workshop at Hong Kong University as part of a larger project on post-socialist marriage and sexuality. We talk with her about the changing trends of marriage and divorce in China.

Learn more about Deborah Davis.

Guest: Fabian Drixler, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: October 12, 2011

Professor Drixler teaches Japanese history. We talk with him about his forthcoming book, Infanticide and Fertility in Japan, 1650-1950.

Learn more about Fabian Drixler.

Guest: Lieutenant General Sir Graeme Lamb (Ret.)
Episode: October 5, 2011

Lieutenant General Sir Graeme Lamb is a retired British Army officer with 38 years experience and a former Commander of the Field Army. Currently he is spending a semester at Yale as a Jackson Institute Senior Fellow teaching the Middle East and Central Asia module of its Gateway to Global Affairs course.

In 2009, Lamb stepped down as Commander of the Field Army and returned to Afghanistan at the request of General David Petraeus and General Stanley McCrystal of the U.S. Army to play a key role in the counter-insurgency efforts there, attempting to reproduce his success in Iraq by persuading Afghan insurgents to abandon their arms. Today we talk with Lamb about his military experience and how it translates to the classroom.

Learn more about Lieutenant General Sir Graeme Lamb (Ret.).

Guest: Marci Shore, Associate Professor of History
Episode: April 6, 2011

Professor Shore teaches European intellectual history. She is the author ofCaviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918 to 1968, and the translator of Michal Glowinski‘s Holocaust memoir, The Black Seasons. We talk with her about the book she’s currently finishing, The Taste of Ashes.

Learn more about Marci Shore.

Guest: Tariq Thachil, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: March 30, 2011

Professor Thachil’s research focuses on political parties and party-voter linkages, social movements, ethnic politics, and South Asian politics. His work has appeared in Comparative Politics and Contemporary South Asia. We talk with him about how religious nationalists in India use social services to expand their electoral base among the poor.

Learn more about Tariq Thachil.

Guest: Pia Rebello Britto, Associate Research Scientist, Yale Child Study Center
Episode: March 23, 2011

Professor Britto is known nationally for her work on young children’s literacy, and social and identity development of Muslim Arab children, as well as internationally for her scientific commitment to cross-cultural issues, evidence-based national policy development, and early learning standards for young children. Her primary expertise is in the role of sociocultural factors in child development, and early childhood policies and programs in the developing world. We talk with her about early childhood development and policy in a global context.

Learn more about Pia Rebello Britto.

Guest: Peter Perdue, Professor of History
Episode: March 2, 2011

Professor Perdue is the author of two widely-acclaimed books: Exhausting the Earth: State and Peasant in Hunan 1500-1850 A.D. and China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia. He has also written on grain markets in China, agricultural development, and environmental history. Professor Perdue’s research interests lie in modern Chinese and Japanese social and economic history, history of frontiers, and world history. We talk with him about Chinese cultural and economic associations with tea, examined in historical perspective.

Learn more about Peter Perdue.

Guest: Mike McGovern, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: February 23, 2011

Professor McGovern is a political anthropologist who works in West Africa and uses a variety of sources from kinship idioms to the aesthetics of state-sponsored folklore to try to understand postcolonial states within the arc of longer historical trajectories. We talk with him about his first book, entitledMaking War in Côte d’Ivoire.

Learn more about Mike McGovern.

Guest: John Darnell, Professor of Egyptology
Episode: February 16, 2011

Professor Darnell’s interests include Egyptian religion, cryptography, the scripts and texts of Graeco-Roman Egypt, and the archaeological and epigraphic remains of ancient activity in the Egyptian Western Desert. He has considerable field experience in Egypt and his discoveries—including the Scorpion tableau, perhaps the earliest historical record of ancient Egypt, and the earliest alphabetic inscriptions in the Wadi el-Hol—have yielded new insight into ancient Egyptian civilization. We talk with him about his work in Egypt.

Learn more about John Darnell.

Guest: Ana De La O, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: February 9, 2011

Professor De La O’s research interests include causes and consequences of redistribution, politics of public goods provision, effects of anti-poverty programs on the political behavior of recipients in developing countries, particularly Latin America, and the use of field experimental research methods. We talk with Professor De La O about her recent research on the politics of conditional cash transfers in Latin America.

Learn more about Ana De La O.

Guest: Haun Saussy, Bird White Housum Professor of Comparative Literature
Episode: February 2, 2011

Professor Saussy has a range of scholarly interests, including Chinese poetry, literature, aesthetics and culture. His published articles explore a wide variety of topics such as Chinese musicology, the history of the idea of oral literature, Haitian literature, health care for the poor and contemporary art. In his first book, The Problem of a Chinese Aesthetic, he applied a new model of comparative literature. In his book, Great Walls of Discourse and Other Adventures in Cultural China, he examines the ways that assumptions and consensus within a discipline affect collective thinking about the object of study. We talk with Professor Saussy about comparative literature – its current situation and theoretical perplexities.

Learn more about Haun Saussy.

Guest: Catherine Panter-Brick, Professor of Anthropology, Health, and Global Affairs
Episode: January 26, 2011

Professor Panter-Brick’s research consists of critical analyses of health and wellbeing across key stages of human development, giving special attention to the impact of poverty, disease, malnutrition, armed conflict, and social marginalization. She has published widely on child and adolescent health, including articles on violence and mental health in Afghanistan, household decision-making and infant survival in famine-stricken Niger, the social ecology of growth retardation in Nepali slums, biomarkers of stress in contexts of violence and homelessness, the effectiveness of public health interventions, and human rights and public health approaches as applied to international work with street children. We talk with Professor Panter-Brick about research she�s done in Afghanistan focusing on the mental health of children.

Learn more about Catherine Panter-Brick

Guest: Adria Lawrence, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: January 19, 2011

Professor Lawrence is a scholar of the Middle East, with particular expertise in North African politics.  She studies conflict and collective action, investigating how people come to mobilize in favor of ideologies such as ethnicity, nationalism, religion, and democracy. We talk with Professor Lawrence about her new manuscript, Imperial Rule and the Politics of Nationalism. It provides an account of how and why nationalist mobilization against colonial rule erupted in the 20th century French Empire.

Learn more about Adria Lawrence.

Guest: Christopher Udry, Henry J. Heinz II Professor of Economics
Episode: January 12, 2011

Professor Udry is a development economist whose research focuses on rural economic activity in sub-Saharan Africa. He has conducted extensive field research in West Africa on technological change in agriculture, the use of financial markets, asset accumulation and gift exchange to cope with risk, gender relations and the structure of household economies, property rights and a variety of other aspects of rural economic organization. We talk with Professor Udry about land rights and agricultural investment in Ghana.

Learn more about Christopher Udry.

Guest: Hillary Mann Leverett, a Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: December 8, 2010

Hillary Mann Leverett has more than 20 years of academic, legal, business, diplomatic, and policy experience working on Middle Eastern issues. In the Bush Administration, Ms. Leverett worked as the Director for Iran, Afghanistan and Persian Gulf Affairs at the National Security Council, Middle East specialist on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as Political Advisor for Middle East and Central Asian issues for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. From 2001-2003, she was one of a small number of U.S. diplomats authorized to negotiate with the Iranians over Afghanistan, al-Qa’ida, and Iraq. In September 2009, Ms. Leverett launched the web site RaceForIran.com that offers perspectives on Iran and its geopolitics. We talk with Ms. Leverett about Iran and the future of American power.

Learn more about Hillary Mann Leverett.

Guest: Julia Adams, Professor of Sociology and Professor of International and Area Studies
Episode: December 1, 2010

Professor Adams teaches and conducts research in the areas of state formation; gender and family; social theory; early modern European politics; and colonialism and empire. She is currently studying large-scale forms of patriarchal politics and the historical sociology of agency relations. We talk with her about her earlier research on The Familial State and her newer work on Contradictions of Agency in Contemporary America.

Learn more about Professor Adams.

Guest: Marwan Muasher, Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: November 17, 2010

A Jordanian diplomat and politician, Ambassador Muasher opened Jordan’s first embassy in Israel in 1995. From 1997 to 2002, he served in Washington as Ambassador, negotiating the first free trade agreement between the United States and an Arab nation. He then returned to Jordan to serve as Foreign Minister and then Deputy Prime Minister. Ambassador Muasher was at the Jordanian Senate until March 2007 when he joined the World Bank as Senior Vice President for External Affairs. Most recently, he wrote a book called The Arab Center. We talk with Ambassador Muasher about the Palestinian-Israeli peace talks and his case for taking a regional approach.

Learn more about Ambassador Muasher.

Guest: Flynt Leverett, Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Episode: November 10, 2010

From 1992 to 2003, Mr. Leverett served as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. Mr. Leverett’s articles and Op Eds on Iran, other Middle East issues, and global energy affairs have been published in numerous media outlets. We talk with Mr. Leverett about American grand strategy in the Middle East and his judgment that we are on the road to failure in this critical region.

Learn more about Mr. Leverett.

Guest: James Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science, Professor of Anthropology, and Co-director of the Agrarian Studies Program
Episode: November 3, 2010

The author of several books including Seeing Like a State, Professor Scott’s research concerns political economy, comparative agrarian societies, theories of hegemony and resistance, peasant politics, revolution, Southeast Asia, theories of class relations and anarchism. We talk with Professor Scott about his newest book, The Art of Not Being Governed. It is the first-ever examination of the volumes of literature on state-making that evaluates why people would deliberately remain stateless.

Learn more about Professor Scott.

Guest: Robert Shiller, Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics, Cowles Foundation, and School of Management
Episode: October 27, 2010

Professor Shiller has written numerous articles and books about financial markets, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and public attitudes, opinions and moral judgments regarding markets. He is the former vice president of the American Economic Association and former president of the Eastern Economic Association. Professor Shiller’s column, “Economic View,” appears in The New York Times. We talk with him about The Squam Lake Report – his latest book collaboration with 14 of the world’s leading economists that offers a plan on how to fix our financial system.

Learn more about Professor Shiller.

Guest: James Levinsohn, Charles W. Goodyear Professor in Global Affairs
Episode: October 20, 2010

As the Jackson Institute’s first director, Professor Levinsohn brings a wealth of international experience to that post. His fields of interest include international economics, industrial organization, economic development and applied econometrics. Recently, he has studied the impact of HIV/AIDS on unemployment and school attendance in South Africa. Professor Levinsohn has lived and worked in Senegal, Botswana, and South Africa. One of his projects, now in its 11th year, trains government officials, university faculty and students, and NGO staff from over a dozen countries in southern Africa on how to use data to inform policymaking. We talk with Professor Levinsohn about the new Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.

Learn more about Professor Levinsohn.

Guest: Stephen Roach, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and School of Management
Episode: October 13, 2010

Mr. Roach has spent twenty-eight years in senior positions at Morgan Stanley — the bulk of that time as Chief Economist and more recently as Chairman of the firm’s Asian businesses. In addition to his position at Yale, he remains the Non-Executive Chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia. Mr. Roach has long been one of Wall Street’s most influential economists. His most recent book, The Next Asia: Opportunities and Challenges for a New Globalization analyzes Asia’s economic imbalances and the dangers of the region’s dependence on Western consumers. We talk with Mr. Roach about the future of China and what it means for the global economy.

Learn more about Stephen Roach.

Guest: Jonathan Wyrtzen, Assistant Professor of Sociology and International Affairs
Episode: April 28, 2010

Professor Wyrtzen is a comparative-historical sociologist with teaching and research interests in North African society and politics. He works on the areas of state formation; colonialism and empire; ethnicity and nationalism; urban and rural contentious politics; and Islamic social movements. We talk with Professor Wyrtzen about his new book Constructing Morocco: Colonial State-Building and the Struggle to Define the Nation.

Learn more about Professor Wyrtzen.

Guest: Stuart Schwartz, George Burton Adams Professor of History
Episode: April 21, 2010

Professor Schwartz specializes in the history of colonial Latin America, especially Brazil and on the history of Early Modern expansion. Among his books are Sovereignty and Society in Colonial Brazil; Early Latin America;Sugar Plantations in the Formation of Brazilian Society; Slaves, Peasants, and Rebels; Cambridge History Of Native Peoples Of The Americas; and South America. He is presently working on several projects: a history of independence of Portugal and the crisis of the Iberian Atlantic, 1620-1670; and a social history of Caribbean hurricanes. We talk with him about his newest, groundbreaking book, All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World.

Learn more about Professor Schwartz.

Guest: Frank Griffel, Professor of Islamic Studies
Episode: April 14, 2010

Professor Griffel teaches courses on the intellectual history of Islam, its theology, and the way Islamic thinkers react to Western modernity. He has published widely in the fields of Islamic theology, Arab and Islamic philosophy, Islamic law, and Muslim intellectual history. We talk with Professor Griffel about his new book Al-Ghazali’s Philosophical Theology.

Learn more about Professor Griffel.

Guest: Jason Lyall, Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Political Science
Episode: March 31, 2010

Jason Lyall’s research focuses on the dynamics of violence in both conventional and guerrilla warfare, with special emphasis on Afghanistan and Russia’s Northern Caucasus—particularly Chechnya. His work draws on diverse methods, ranging from historical and cross-national comparisons to field and quasi-experiments at the subnational and local level. His research has been published in the American Political Science Review, International Organization, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and World Politics. We talk with him about his article that’s forthcoming in the American Political Science Review on ethnicity and violence in Chechnya.

Learn more about Professor Lyall.

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Program in European Union Studies
Episode: March 24, 2010

Professor Cameron teaches courses on European politics and the European Union. Over the past several weeks, the European Union has been caught up in a crisis over the size of the budget deficit in Greece. Some think the crisis could spread to other countries in southern Europe - Spain, Portugal, Italy - that, like Greece, participate in the eurozone but have large budget deficits and high levels of debt.  Professor Cameron discusses the current eurozone crisis - why it has arisen and what’s likely to happen in the near future and the longer-term.

Learn more about Professor Cameron.

Guest: Jessica Weiss, Assistant Professor of Political Science and a Research Fellow at the MacMillan Center
Episode: March 3, 2010

Professor Weiss’s research interests include Chinese politics and international relations, nationalism, and social protest. Before joining the Yale faculty, she founded FACES, the Forum for American/Chinese Exchange at Stanford University. She teaches courses on anti-Americanism in world politics, Chinese foreign policy, and state-society relations in post-Mao China. We talk with her about her recent paper on anti-foreign protests in China.

Learn more about Professor Weiss

Guest: Steven Wilkinson, Nilekani Professor of India and South Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
Episode: February 17, 2010

Much of Professor Wilkinson’s work focuses on India and ethnic violence. His book, Votes and Violence: Electoral Competition and Ethnic Riots in India was co-winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Woodrow Wilson prize for the best book published in government, politics and international affairs. We talk with Professor Wilkinson about his current book project on Colonization, Democracy and Conflict.

Learn more about Professor Wilkinson

Guest: Nuno Monteiro, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: February 10, 2010

Professor Monteiro’s main research interests are in International Relations theory and security studies. We talk with him about his forthcoming book that addresses three questions related to the topic of unipolarity: Is it peaceful? Is it durable? And, how does it impact deterrence?

Learn more about Professor Monteiro

Guest: Alexandre Debs, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: January 27, 2010

Professor Debs’ research interests include the political economy of dictatorship, development and war. His work has appeared in the Journal of the History of Economic Thought. We talk with Professor Debs about his newest paper, Living by the Sword and Dying by the Sword? Leadership Transitions In and Out of Dictatorships.

Learn more about Professor Debs

Guest: Judge Richard Goldstone, Former South African Constitutional Judge, and Author of The Goldstone Report on the Gaza Conflict
Episode: January 27, 2010

Judge Richard Goldstone is a native of South Africa and well known for investigating atrocities committed by white security forces during apartheid. He also is the former chief prosecutor for war-crime tribunals on Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. More recently, Judge Goldstone was asked to head the United Nations Fact-Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict that investigated allegations of war crimes between Israelis and Palestinians. We talk with Judge Goldstone about accountability for war crimes.

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Guest: Rolena Adorno, Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Spanish
Episode: January 20, 2010

Professor Adorno has done groundbreaking work in Latin American literary studies and has won several awards for it. Her scholarly work focuses on the field of literary cultural production in colonial Latin America. Her recent books explore the Spanish writings about the New World that includes both a prize-winning, three-volume book on early Spanish exploration of the area now part of the U.S. Southwest, and one that takes up the role that the historical, theoretical, and polemical works written during the colonial period in Latin America have played in the history of Latin American literature and thought. In November, she was appointed to the National Council on the Humanities.

Learn more about Professor Adorno.

Guest: Jun Saito, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: January 13, 2010

Professor Saito’s research focuses on the institutional determinants of representation and redistribution, in particular how choices of constitutional structures and electoral institutions translate into redistributive consequences. He teaches courses on Japanese politics, international relations in East Asia, and comparative political institutions. From 2002 to 2003, Professor Saito was a member of the Japanese House of Representatives. We talk with him about the end of the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan.

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Guest: Jeremy Seekings, Visiting Professor of Economics
Episode: December 16, 2009

Professor Seekings is based at the University of Cape Town in South Africa where he has a joint appointment as Professor of Political Studies and Sociology. Professor Seekings leads a variety of research projects encompassing both quantitative and qualitative research. These include studies of adolescence, race and class, violence, AIDS and poverty, social policy, and politics. Most of his research concerns South Africa, but he also conducts research in Brazil, the Caribbean, and other parts of Africa. Today we will talk with Professor Seekings about his recent article titled “Deserving individuals and groups: the post-apartheid state’s justification of the shape of South Africa’s system of social assistance.”

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Guest: Nicoli Nattrass, Visiting Professor of Economics
Episode: December 9, 2009

Professor Nattrass is based at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where she a Professor of Economics and the Director of the AIDS and Society Research Unit. Her research interests include unemployment and economic policy in South Africa, the political economy of anti-retroviral treatment, AIDS policy and AIDS denialism in South Africa. She has written numerous scholarly articles and several books, including The Moral Economy of AIDS in South Africa and Mortal Combat: AIDS Denialism and the Struggle for Anti-retrovirals in South Africa. We talk with her about her AIDS research.

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Guest: Tina Lu, Professor of Chinese Literature
Episode: December 2, 2009

Professor Lu’s research interests include Chinese fiction and drama during the period between 1550 and 1750. We talk with her about her book, Accidental Incest, Filial Cannibalism, and Other Peculiar Encounters in Late Imperial Chinese Literature.

Learn more about Professor Lu.

Guest: David Jackson, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese
Episode: November 11, 2009

Professor Jackson’s research interests focus on Portuguese and Brazilian Literatures; modernist and inter-arts literature; Portuguese culture in Asia; and ethnomusicology. He has written and edited several books and other publications. We talk with Professor Jackson about his forthcoming book,Adverse Genres in Fernando Pessoa.

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Guest: Thad Dunning, Associate Professor of Political Science
Episode: October 28, 2009

Professor Dunning studies comparative politics, political economy, and methodology. His book, Crude Democracy: Natural Resource Wealth and Political Regimes contrasts the democratic and authoritarian effects of natural resource wealth.  His current work on ethnic and other cleavages draws on field and natural experiments and qualitative fieldwork in Latin America, India, and Africa.  Dunning has written on a range of methodological topics, including econometric corrections for selection effects and the use of natural experiments in the social sciences.  We talk with Professor Dunning about a study he recently completed on voting in Mali.

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Guest: Kamari Clarke, Professor of Anthropology, and Chair of the Council on African Studies
Episode: October 21, 2009

Professor Clarke’s areas of research explore issues related to religious nationalism, legal institutions, international law, the interface between culture and power and its relationship to the modernity of race and late capitalist globalization. Her recent articles and books have focused on religious and legal movements and the related production of knowledge and power, including the 2004 publication of Mapping Yoruba Networks: Power and Agency in the Making of Transnational Communities. We talk with Professor Clarke about her newest book, Fictions of Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Challenge of Legal Pluralism in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Guest: Robert Harms, Henry J. Heinz Professor of History & African Studies
Episode: October 14, 2009

Professor Harms is the author of The Diligent: A Voyage through the Worlds of the Slave Trade, which has won numerous prestigious awards. He has also written two books on the history of equatorial Africa:  River of Wealth, River of Sorrow:  The Central Zaire Basin in the Era of the Slave and Ivory Trade andGames Against Nature: An Eco-Cultural History of the Nunu of Equatorial Africa. We talk with Professor Harms about his newest research, a book calledThe Imperialists and the Slave Trader: Conflict, Collaboration, and the Making of Colonialism in Equatorial Africa, 1874-1905.

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Guest: Professor Elisabeth Wood
Episode: October 7, 2009

Professor Wood’s current research focuses on sexual violence during war. She is the author of Insurgent Collective Action and Civil War in El Salvador andForging Democracy from Below: Insurgent Transitions in South Africa and El Salvador, as well as various scholarly articles. We talk with Professor Wood about two of her recently published works on sexual violence during war.

Learn more about Professor Wood.

Guest: Frances Rosenbluth, Deputy Provost for the Social Sciences and Faculty Development
Episode: September 30, 2009

Frances Rosenbluth, Deputy Provost for the Social Sciences and Faculty Development at Yale University, is a comparative political economist with research interests in war and constitutions, Japanese politics and political economy, and the political economy of gender.  The author of numerous articles and book chapters, Professor Rosenbluth has written several books: The Politics of Oligarchy: Institutional Choice in Imperial Japan, Japan’s Political Marketplace and Financial Politics in Contemporary Japan; and Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Reform. We talk with her about her newest book, Women, Work, and Power: The Political Economy of Gender Inequality.

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Guest: Vivek Sharma, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Episode: September 23, 2009

Vivek Sharma, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale, is broadly interested in the relationship between social institutions and political order including alliances, warfare, and violence. To this end he is working on several projects that examine property, kinship, military organization and political authority in the history of Europe.  We talk with Professor Sharma about his social theory of war.

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Guest: Iván Szelényi, William Graham Sumner Professor of Sociology and Professor of Political Science
Episode: May 27, 2009

The William Graham Sumner Professor of Sociology and Professor of Political Science, Professor Szelényi researches social inequalities from a comparative and historical perspective. His recent book, Patterns of Exclusion, examines how the social conditions of the Roma, or Gypsies, have changed over time and across countries in Central and Southern Europe.

Learn more about Iván Szelényi

Guest: Paul Sabin, Assistant Professor of History
Episode: May 20, 2009

An assistant professor of environmental history, Professor Sabin’s research and teaching focus on United States environmental history, energy politics, and political and economic history, including natural resource development in the American West and overseas. His book, Crude Politics, examines how politics and law shaped a growing dependence on petroleum in California and the nation.  Professor Sabin talks about how history can prepare us for the climate crisis and energy transition.

Learn more about Paul Sabin

Guest: John Roemer, Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Economics
Episode: May 13, 2009

The Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Economics, Professor John Roemer’s research concerns political economy and distributive justice. His books include Racism, Xenophobia, and Distribution; Democracy, Education, and Equality; Political Competition; Equality of Opportunity; and Theories of Distributive Justice. Professor Roemer talks about the future of capitalism.

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Guest: Abbas Amanat, Professor of History and International and Area Studies, and Director, Iranian Studies Initiative
Episode: May 6, 2009

A Professor of History and International and Area Studies, and Director of the Iranian Studies Initiative at the MacMillan Center, Professor Amanat’s teaching and research interests include modern Iran and the Middle East, Shi’ism, and apocalypticism. His principal publications include Pivot of the Universe andResurrection and Renewal. Professor Amanat talks about his newest book,Apocalyptic Islam and Iranian Shi’ism.

Learn more about Abbas Amanat
Apocalyptic Islam and Iranian Shi’ism  

Guest: Erik Harms, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Episode: April 29, 2009

Professor Erik Harms, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, is a socio-cultural anthropologist with research interests in the study of urban and peri-urban life, and rural-urban transitions. He specializes in the political, economic, and social transformations engulfing the post-colonial “megacities” of Southeast Asia and has carried out extensive fieldwork in and around Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Professor Harms talks about his newest book, Saigon’s Edge.

Learn more about Erik Harms

Guest: VP and Secretary Linda Lorimer
Episode: April 22, 2009

Since 1993, Linda Lorimer, Vice President and Secretary of Yale, has served as the senior counselor to President Levin and is the leader of major strategic initiatives for Yale. In recent years, she has developed an ambitious strategy and numerous programs for internationalizing the University. We talk with her about those plans.

Learn more about Linda Lorimer 
The Internationalization of Yale: 2005-2008

Guest: David Cameron, Professor of Political Science, and Director, Program in European Union Studies
Episode: April 15, 2009

A Professor of Political Science at Yale and the Director of the Program in European Union Studies at the MacMillan Center, Professor David Cameron teaches courses on European politics and the European Union. He has written extensively about the impact of trade openness on government and, with respect to the EU, about the initiative to complete the internal market, the operation of the European Monetary System, and the enlargement of the EU. Professor Cameron talks about the EU and the European economics crisis.

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Guest: Philip Gorski, Professor of Sociology and Co-Director, Center for Comparative Research
Episode: April 8, 2009

Professor Philip Gorski is Professor of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Research at Yale. He is a comparative-historical sociologist and his research focuses on topics such as state-formation, nationalism, revolution, economic development and secularization with particular attention to the interaction of religion and politics. Professor Gorski talks about Civil Religion and his new theory.

Learn more about Professor Gorski

Guest: Francesca Trivellato, Professor of History
Episode: April 1, 2009

A Professor of History at Yale, Professor Francesca Trivellato specializes in the social and economic history of Italy, continental Europe and the Mediterranean in the early modern period. She is the author of a book on Venetian glass manufacturing and she has also published several essays on craft guilds, women’s work, and merchant networks. We talk with her about her newest book The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period.

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Guest: Gustav Ranis, Frank Altschul Professor Emeritus of International Economics
Episode: March 25, 2009

Professor Gustav Ranis, Frank Altschul Professor Emeritus of International Economics at Yale, and former Director of the MacMillan Center from 1996 to 2004, has more than 20 books and 300 articles on theoretical and policy-related issues of economic and human development to his credit.  He served as Assistant Administrator for Policy and Planning in AID/Department of State during the Johnson administration. Professor Ranis talks about his research on the priority of human development.

Learn more about Professor Ranis

Guest: Mridu Rai, Associate Professor of History
Episode: March 18, 2009

An Associate Professor in the History Department at Yale, Professor Mridu Rai’s doctoral research focused on the problem of religion, politics and protest in modern Kashmir. It culminated in her book, Hindu Rulers, Muslim Subjects: Islam, Rights and the History of Kashmir. She talks with us today about her new research in the region of Bihar, India, that explores the relationships between caste, territory, region, and nation as they evolved from the period of British colonial rule into the postcolonial era.

Learn more about Professor Rai

Guest: Steven Pincus, Professor of History, and Chair, European Studies Council
Episode: March 11, 2009

A Professor of History, Professor Steven Pincus teaches early modern British and European history. He is the author of Protestantism and Patriotism: Ideologies and the Making of English Foreign Policy, 1650-1668 andEngland’s Glorious Revolution 1688-89. He has also published numerous essays on the cultural, political and intellectual history of early modern Britain.  Professor Pincus talks about his newest book called 1688: The First Modern Revolution.

Learn more about Professor Pincus

Guest: Professor Susan Stokes, John S. Saden Professor of Political Science, and Director, Yale Program on Democracy
Episode: March 4, 2009

A Professor of Economics at Yale, and President and Founder of Innovations for Poverty Action, Professor Dean Karlan research interests include poverty issues in developing countries and, in particular, financial innovations and microfinance programs aimed at the poor. He uses field experiments to learn what social policies work, what do not, and why. Professor Karlan also does research on fundraising, voting, education, and behavioral economics.  In this episode, he talks about Innovations for Poverty Action and commitment contracts at www.stickK.com.

Learn more about Professor Karlan
Innovations for Poverty Action
Commitment Contracts at www.stickK.com

Guest: David Skelly, Professor of Ecology
Episode: February 11, 2009

A Professor of Ecology at Yale’s Environment School, David Skelly is interested in animal ecology, conservation and management. His studies of amphibians are directed at determining the causes of patterns such as evolution, and the extinction and establishment of populations. Professor Skelly talks about rapid evolution – the idea that evolution can keep pace with environmental change.

Learn more about Professor Skelly

Guest: Aleh Tsyvinski, Professor of Economics, and Co-Director, Macroeconomic Research Program, Cowles Foundation
Episode: February 4, 2009

A Professor of Economics, and the Co-Director of the Macroeconomic Research Program at the Cowles Foundation at Yale University, Professor Tsyvinski talks about his new research with Sergei Guriev and Maxim Trudolubov on Russian values and their attitudes toward the West.

Learn more about Professor Tsyvinski

Guest: Jennifer Ruger, Associate Professor, Yale School of Public Health
Episode: January 28, 2009

An Associate Professor at the Yale School of Public Health, and co-director of the Yale/World Health Organization Centre for Health Promotion, Policy, and Research, Professor Ruger is working to promote the creation of public health programs that make more efficient use of scarce resources while improving current healthcare practices. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently invited her to testify about how the management of global health institutions and governance might be improved. Professor Ruger talks about the IOM report on Global Health.

Learn more about Professor Ruger
View Institute of Medicine’s Report, “The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the New Administration”

Guest: Prof. David W. Blight, Director, Gilder Lehrman Center, and Class of 1954 Professor of American History
Episode: December 10, 2008

Professor Blight, the Class of 1954 Professor of History at Yale University, is the director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at the MacMillan Center.  He has written numerous books on race and American history, and lectures widely on Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, and problems in public history and American historical memory.  Today we talk with Professor Blight about his newest book, A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation.

Learn more about Professor Blight

Guest: Ben Kiernan, Whitney Griswold Professor of History, and Director, Genocide Studies Program
Episode: December 3, 2008

Professor Ben Kiernan is the Whitney Griswold Professor of History at Yale University, and the founding Director of Yale’s Genocide Studies Program. For more than thirty years, Professor Kiernan has studied and written about genocide and crimes against humanity. He founded the Cambodian Genocide Program at the MacMillan Center in 1994 to document the crimes of Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge regime and pursue justice for its victims. His recent book –Blood and Soil, a World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur is another important achievement.  It is the first global history of genocide, and in it Professor Kiernan examines outbreaks of mass violence from the classical era to the present.

Learn more about Professor Kiernan

Guest: Dean Karlan, Professor of Economics and President and Founder, Innovations for Poverty Action
Episode: November 26, 2008

A Professor of Economics at Yale, and President and Founder of Innovations for Poverty Action, Professor Dean Karlan research interests include poverty issues in developing countries and, in particular, financial innovations and microfinance programs aimed at the poor. He uses field experiments to learn what social policies work, what do not, and why. Professor Karlan also does research on fundraising, voting, education, and behavioral economics.  In this episode, he talks about Innovations for Poverty Action and commitment contracts at www.stickK.com.

Learn more about Professor Karlan
Innovations for Poverty Action
Commitment Contracts at www.stickK.com

Guest: Professor Philip Gorski
Episode: November 19, 2008

Professor Philip Gorski is Professor of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Research at Yale. He is a comparative-historical sociologist and his research focuses on topics such as state-formation, nationalism, revolution, economic development and secularization with particular attention to the interaction of religion and politics. Professor Gorski talks about Civil Religion and his new theory.

Guest: Prof. Sivaramakrishnan
Episode: November 12, 2008

A Professor in both the Anthropology and Forestry & Environmental Studies departments at Yale, as well as Chair of the South Asian Studies Council, Professor Sivaramakrishnan’s research interests span environmental history, political anthropology, cultural geography, development and science studies. He has published widely in all these fields, with a regional focus on South Asia. Professor Sivaramakrishnan talks about his new work on environmental conflicts in India.

Learn more about Professor Sivaramakrishnan

Guest: Prof. Alec Stone Sweet
Episode: November 5, 2008

The Leitner Professor of Law, Politics, and International Studies, Professor Stone Sweet’s interests are comparative and international politics and law, and European integration. His research focuses on how rule systems emerge and evolve over time, and with what consequences for society. Most of his published work approaches this question by looking at how new legal systems develop, including his newest book, A Europe of Rights: The Impact of the European Convention on Human Rights on National Legal Systems.

Learn more about Professor Stone Sweet
Selected research

Guest: Prof. Marcia Inhorn
Episode: October 29, 2008

Marcia Inhorn is the William K. Lanman Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs, Chair of the Council on Middle East Studies at the MacMillan Center, and a specialist on Middle Eastern gender and health issues. She has conducted research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America over the past 20 years. Professor Inhorn is considered to be a pioneer in studying the role of technology in reproductive issues, especially in Muslim settings.

More About Professor Inhorn

Guest: Thomas Pogge, Leitner Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs
Episode: October 22, 2008

Professor Thomas Pogge is a political philosopher who has published widely on Kant and in moral and political philosophy, including books on John Rawls and global justice. His book World Poverty and Human Rights is widely regarded as one of the most important works on global justice. Professor Pogge talks about a non-profit organization he leads called Incentives for Global Health and its new flagship proposal – the Health Impact Fund (HIF). The HIF offers an innovative way of stimulating research and development of new medicines in order to provide them to patients – especially those in the developing world – at low prices.

More About Professor Pogge
More About Incentives for Global Health and Health Impact Fund

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